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Apostrophes in Contractions

Apostrophes in Contractions

Author: Kimberly Sombke
Objective:

Apostrophe use and formation of contractions from two separate words are discussed here. Rules for replacing letters with an apostrophe are also covered.

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Apostrophes & Contractions

Apostrophes in Contractions

*First let’s define contraction: A contraction is one word that is made from two words. To form a contraction, remove one or more letters and replace it/them with an apostrophe (or floating comma).

*Here is how some common contractions are made:

do not = don’t

does not = doesn’t

cannot = can’t

will not = won’t

would not = wouldn’t

should not = shouldn’t

I would = I’d

I will = I’ll

she will = she’ll

he will = he’ll

you will = you’ll

you are = you’re (This doesn’t show possession!)

they are = they’re (This doesn’t show possession!)

let us = let’s

that is = that’s

it is = it’s (This doesn’t show possession!)

*As indicated with you’re, they’re, and it’s above, sometimes contractions and possessive pronouns are easily confused. Remember that contractions will always have an apostrophe replacing a letter.

*When should you use contractions? Contractions are okay to use in conversational, informal writing and speaking platforms. Avoid using contractions in academic or professional settings where proper grammar is more appropriate.

Source: Kimberly Sombke

Apostrophes and Contractions

Source: Kimberly Sombke

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