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3 Tutorials that teach Determining Standard Deviation
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Determining Standard Deviation

Determining Standard Deviation

 
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Author: Todd
Objective:
This lesson demonstrates how to find standard deviation.
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Source: Video created by Todd

Questions and Answers

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    Larry Musolino 29 days ago

    This formula shown in the video is incorrect.
    The formula shown uses sigma and mu which is the formula for population standard deviation. But the formula also uses denominator of n - 1 which is the formula formula for sample standard deviation. So the notation here is incorrect, since this is mixing together two different formulas, for population and sample standard deviation. This is confusing for students. For sample standard deviation involving "n - 1", this should be represented as "s" and not "sigma"

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  • Jessica Trujillo
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    Jessica Trujillo almost 2 years ago

    Overall the video is clear and I like the basic explanation. Makes it seem like statistics is less daunting of a challenge. Not sure how to rate the completeness of the tutorial As someone who is new to statistics, its not clear how the n-1 eventually became a 4.

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    Bruce Francis over 2 years ago

    Looks good. Video a bit hard to read, but serviceable. Might help to add a bit of explanation about what a standard deviation does? Can these be put together into a min-curriculum?

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Academic Reviews
SOPHIA has reviewed the tutorial and found it academically sound.
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