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Internet & Web Technologies

Internet & Web Technologies

 
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Author: Hazman Aziz
Objective:

This subject introduces to fundamental Internet and web technologies that a library technologist needed to know. Topics such as the development of Internet and library science, semantic web, mash up, open access, mobile development , search engine optimisation, new media technologie and client-side scripting.

Basically, this will give you a brief knowledge on building an online information service platform. Non profit organisation or cultural institituion will be your client senario in this process of knowledge learning and development.

The subject shares on the knowledge how to use some of these technologies to develop static and dynamic web pages with an emphasis on client-side scripts to enhance a e-business operations. The subject explains the differences between client-side and server-side Web development, and shows students how to build simple web applications using scripting and other tools from the open sources development. The subject also covers current Web “standards” and future W3C recommendations.

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Topic Discussed for this Subjects

Topics

  1. Introduction to eCommerce
  2. Introduction to XML
  3. Semantic Web Technologies
  4. Mashups Applications
  5. Mobile Application
  6. Search Engine Optimization
  7. Technology related to Social Media
  8. Cloud Computing
  9. eBusiness Intelligence
  10. Web Sustainability

Introduction to Extensible Markup Language (XML)

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi

Part I: Introducing XML
This section starts with an XML concepts chapter that gives an overview and history of XML, its purposes, and comparisons against previous and alternative data integration technologies. We then proceed to describe XML basic formats, XML well-formedness, and XML validation against DTDs and schemas. The chapters on XSL transformations and XSL formatting objects illustrate the transformation and formatting of XML data using XML via working examples. Part I ends with examples of parsing XML documents, including examples of XML parsing using SAX and DOM.

Chapter 1: XML Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Chapter 2: XML Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Chapter 3: XML Data Format and Validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Chapter 4: XML Parsing Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Chapter 5: Parsing XML with DOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Chapter 6: Parsing XML with SAX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Chapter 7: XSLT Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Chapter 8: XSL Transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Chapter 9: XSL Formatting Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217

Part II: Microsoft Office and XML
This section provides examples of generating XML from MS access data as well as creating an Excel spreadsheet from an XML data source. These examples illustrate MS-specific techniques for parsing and generating MS-derived XML. We review the sample code in the chapters line-by line so that previous VBA/VB code knowledge is not necessary to understand and work with the examples.

Chapter 10: Microsoft XML Core Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
Chapter 11: Working with the MSXML DOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Chapter 12: Generating XML from MS Access Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Chapter 13: Creating an Excel Spreadsheet from an XML Data Source . . . . . . 291

Part III: XML Web Applications Using J2EE
This section builds on the basic concepts that were introduced in Parts I and II, showing readers how to create XML Web Applications using J2EE. We review sample code line-by-line, so previous Java/J2EE knowledge is not necessary to understand and work with the examples. Open source libraries for working with Java tools are referenced and specific code examples are provided for working with Xalan and Xerces. We also provide examples for the XML APIs in the Sun Java Web
services Developer Pack (WSDP), including the Java API for XML Processing (JAXP),
Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB), and Java Server Pages Standard Tag
Library (JSTL) APIs.

Chapter 14: XML Tools for J2EE: IBM, Apache, Sun, and Others . . . . . . . . . . 311
Chapter 15: Xerces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Chapter 16: Xalan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
Chapter 17: XML APIs from Sun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361

Part IV: Relational Data and XML
Part IV provides examples of Web applications that use relational XML data. There are many relational XML formats, but most developers work with either SQL Server, DB2, or Oracle, each of which has its own XML output and interactive XML features.

We provide an overview of each RDBMS XML access method, output options, associated unique features, and quirks. After we explain each format, we provide working examples for transforming data from one RDBMS XML format to another.

Chapter 18: Accessing and Formatting XML from SQL Server Data . . . . . . . . 431
Chapter 19: Accessing and Formatting XML from Oracle Data . . . . . . . . . . 473
Chapter 20: Accessing and Formatting XML from DB2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 509
Chapter 21: Building XML-Based Web Applications with JDBC . . . . . . . . . . 539
Chapter 22: Transforming Relational XML Output into Other Formats . . . . . . 591

Part V: Introduction to Web Services
This section introduces Web services that are based on XML formats and technologies. Web service concepts are introduced, and the three key components of Web services, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI are discussed in detail, with illustrative examples of each technology. Part V ends with a comparison of J2EE and Microsoft Web services, which both use the same underlying technologies but implement them in subtly different ways.

Chapter 23: Web Service Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 625
Chapter 24: SOAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635
Chapter 25: WSDL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 645
Chapter 26: UDDI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 655
Chapter 27: Microsoft Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 665
Chapter 28: J2EE Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 683

Part VI: Microsoft.NET and Web Services
This section covers the techniques and tools for building Web services for MS .NET. These include using ASP.NET for creating and deploying .NET Web services, accessing .NET Web services from Web applications, and building a Windows-based .NET Web services Client application using Visual Studio.Net and Visual Basic.NET.

Chapter 29: Creating and Deploying .NET Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 699
Chapter 30: Accessing .NET Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 711
Chapter 31: Building a .NET Web Services Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 719

Part VII: Web Services and J2EE
This part of the book illustrates techniques and tools for building Web services using J2EE. Examples are illustrated using open-source Web service Tools for J2EE from IBM, Apache, Sun, and others. We specifically illustrate Web service development with the Sun Java Web services Developer Pack, which includes all of the tools in the Sun Java XML Pack, plus a Java Server Pages Standard Tag Library
(JSTL), the Java WSDP Registry Server, a Web Application Deployment Tool, the Ant

Build Tool, and the Apache Tomcat container. We also provide examples of working with the Apache SOAP toolkit and the IBM Web services Toolkit. We finish this part of the book with examples for deploying

Chapter 32: Web Service Tools for J2EE: IBM, Apache, Sun, and Others . . . . . 737
Chapter 33: Web Services with the Sun Java Web Services Developer Pack . . . 747
Chapter 34: Apache Axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 773
Chapter 35: Accessing Web Services from Java Applications . . . . . . . . . . . 801

Part VIII: Advanced Web Services
This final section covers RDBMS support for Web services. We also delve into the developing standards associated with Web service security. Standards-based options for Web service

Chapter 36: Accessing Relational Data via Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 835
Chapter 37: Authentication and Security for Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . 871

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 885

If you like to read more about Semantic Web Tecnologies, you migh want to visit to this book at NTU Library:http://ezlibproxy1.ntu.edu.sg/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=111578&site=eds-live&scope=site

Source: Benz, B. (2003). XML Programming Bible. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (US). Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

An Introduction to XML: The Basics Part 1

An Introduction to XML provides students and entry-level professionals with demonstrations of the basics of learning XML, covering topics such as Web 2.0, AJAX, RSS, Web Services and managing XML data. The short Web-based video modules are very visual and provide clear examples of XML as well as references to popular Web sites that use XML. Watch the series of modules or select a module by topic, and join the developerWorks community to talk to peers about this and other skills sessions.

An Introduction to XML: XML and Web 2.0 Part 2

Learn in this demo XML in relation to Web Services (SOAP, WSDL) and Web 2.0 (AJAX, RSS, ATOM). Through examples and industry references, this demo provides an introductory look at these concepts and how XML plays a role.

Semantic Web Technologies

The Semantic Web combines the descriptive languages RDF (Resource Description Framework) and OWL (Web Ontology Language), with the data-centric, customizable XML (eXtensible Mark-up Language) to provide descriptions of the content of Web documents. These machine-interpretable descriptions allow more intelligent software systems to be written, automating the analysis and exploitation of web-based information.

Software agents will be able to create automatically new services from already published services, with potentially huge implications for models of e-Business.

Semantic Web Technologies provides a comprehensive overview of key semantic knowledge technologies and research. The authors explain (semi-)automatic ontology generation and metadata extraction in depth, along with ontology management and mediation. Further chapters examine how Semantic Web technology is being applied in knowledge management (“Semantic Information Access”) and in the next generation of Web services.

Semantic Web Technologies:

  • Provides a comprehensive exposition of the state-of-the art in Semantic Web research and key technologies.
  • Explains the use of ontologies and metadata to achieve machine-interpretability.
  • Describes methods for ontology learning and metadata generation.
  • Discusses ontology management and evolution, covering ontology change detection and propagation, ontology dependency and mediation.
  • Illustrates the theoretical concepts with three case studies on industrial applications in digital libraries, the legal sector and the telecommunication industry.

If you like to read more about Semantic Web Tecnologies, you migh want to visit to this book at NTU Library: http://ezlibproxy1.ntu.edu.sg/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=cat00103a&AN=ntu.a826335&site=eds-live&scope=site.

Examples of Semantic Web

At Hazman Labs, Inc. and also NTU Library, as a library technologist, we are involved building a semantic web for blogs, which is a form of Content Management System. Examples are Blogs @ NTU and most projects at Hazman labs, Inc. or NTU Libraries The technology that used to deliver this development is called WordPress Semantics. To find out more, http://codex.wordpress.org/WordPress_Semantics#External_Links.

Source: Davies, J., Studer, R., & Warren, P. (2006). Semantic Web Technologies [electronic resource] : Trends and Research in Ontology-based Systems. Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2006. Retrieved from NTU Library Catalogue database.

Video - Introduction to the Semantic Web

A short introduction to the semantic web. All source material is on the Digital Bazaar wiki: http://wiki.digitalbazaar.com/en/semantic-web-intro.

Video - The Semantic Web of Data - Interview with Tim Berners Lee

The Semantic Web of Data withTim Berners-Lee

Video - Library Search Interface (Prototype)

This is a prototype showing some basic functionality of a library search interface where users can search and explore books enriched with data of the semantic web.

Concept by Julian Stahnke, Lionel Michel, Michael Härtel and Florian Schulz.

Prototype made with Flash by Florian Schulz.

Source: Video located at http://vimeo.com/9300511

References For Semantic Web [NTU Library]

Below are some of the access via NTU Digital Library. Non NTU community, you might want to check out with your own academic librarians:

Textbooks

  1. Du, W., & Ensan, F. (2010). Canadian Semantic Web [electronic resource] : Technologies and Applications / edited by Weichang Du, Faezeh Ensan. Boston, MA : Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, 2010. Retrieved from NTU Library Catalogue database.
  2. Cardoso J, Hepp M, Lytras M. The Semantic Web [electronic resource] : Real-World Applications from Industry / edited by Jorge Cardoso, Martin Hepp, Miltiadis D. Lytras [e-book]. Boston, MA : Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, 2008.; 2008. Available from: NTU Library Catalogue, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 9, 2011.
  3. Daconta M, Obrst L, Smith K. The Semantic Web [electronic resource] : A Guide to the Future of XML, Web Services, and Knowledge Management [e-book]. Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003.; 2003. Available from: NTU Library Catalogue, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 9, 2011.

Journals

  1. Will be update soon.

Mashups Applications

Creating Enterprise-Quality Web 2.0 Mashups: The Complete How-To Guide

Mashups give businesses powerful new ways to leverage today’s massive public and private data resources for competitive advantage. In Mashups: Strategies for the Modern Enterprise, J. Jeffrey Hanson brings together all the knowledge enterprise developers need to create mashups that are reliable, secure, flexible, and effective.

Using detailed sample code and third-party tools, Hanson walks readers through every step of creating a working enterprise mashup, as well as every component: presentation, process, data, and infrastructure. He surveys the styles, technologies, and standards used in mashup development, identifying key trade-offs and helping you choose the best options for your environment. You’ll learn how to overcome technical and business concerns associated with mashups, apply proven mashup patterns, and much more.

Coverage includes

  • Understanding and using presentation-oriented, data-oriented, process-oriented, or hybrid mashup styles

  • Identifying the optimal uses for mashups in your environment

  • Up-front planning: requirements, constraints, and security considerations; stability, reliability, and performance issues

  • Creating an enterprise mashup, step by step: design, identification of services and data sources, and more

  • Creating effective frameworks for mashup mediation and monitoring

  • Applying proven patterns to your enterprise mashup infrastructure

  • Securing mashups: validation, HTML sanitization, protecting iframes, and avoiding common attacks, such as cross-site request forgery

  • Building mashups with third-party tools for Google, Oracle, Salesforce.com, Amazon, and other environments

  • Developing an open, agile environment that supports rapid, flexible development of new mashups

Also of interest: The companion book, Mashup Patterns: Designs and Examples for the Modern Enterprise by Mike Ogrinz (Addison-Wesley), is an indispensable guide to patterns, with insights for making mashups work in production environments.

This book can be found in NTU Library via: Hanson, J. (2009). Mashups : strategies for the modern enterprise / J. Jeffrey Hanson. Upper Saddle River, NJ : Addison-Wesley, c2009. Retrieved from NTU Library Catalogue database.

Source: Hanson, J. (2009). Mashups : strategies for the modern enterprise / J. Jeffrey Hanson. Upper Saddle River, NJ : Addison-Wesley, c2009. Retrieved from NTU Library Catalogue database.

Search Engine Optimization

Here, you are able to learn to delivers the holy grail of online marketing: how to influence search engine results to drive online shoppers to specific Web sites; the process is called search engine optimization (SEO) and it is a hot topic.

You will find out what they need to plan and implement a successful SEO program, including useful tips on finding the shortest routes to success, strategy suggestions, and sidebars with more information and additional resources. Features interviews with executives from top search companies, plus appendices on creating successful listings with Google, MSN, Yahoo!, and other.

Topics include creating an SEO plan; managing keywords; maximizing pay-per-click strategies; understanding the role of links and linking; robots, spiders, and crawlers; maintaining SEO; analyzing success rates; and much more.

Wonder how some companies pop up high in search engine rankings? It's all about search appeal. Master the strategies, techniques, and shortcuts in this detailed SEO guide and you can improve your web site's search rankings and start driving the targeted traffic you want to your virtual door. Learn to punch up keywords, add HTML tags for tracking, evaluate pay-per-click strategies, and much more. If you want to make SEO work for you, this is the book you need to succeed.

  • Learn how to give your web site search appeal

  • Target behaviors and draw the customers you really want

  • Employ social media in your search engine marketing

  • Optimize your site specifically for Google®, MSN®, or Yahoo!®

  • Demystify the role of links and linking in search

  • Understand robots, spiders, and crawlers

  • Analyze your SEO efforts and see what works

  • Make use of SEO tools available online

  • Create a winning SEO plan

  • Read interviews with over a dozen SEO experts

This book can be found in NTU Library Ledford, J. L. (2009). Search engine optimization bible / Jerri L. Ledford. Indianapolis, Ind. : Wiley Pub., c2009. Retrieved from NTU Library Catalogue database.

Source: Ledford, J. L. (2009). Search engine optimization bible / Jerri L. Ledford. Indianapolis, Ind. : Wiley Pub., c2009. Retrieved from NTU Library Catalogue database.

Overview of How Search Engines Work

Search Engines: Technology, Society, and Business. The World Wide Web brings much of the world's knowledge into the reach of nearly everyone with a computer and an internet connection. The availability of huge quantities of information at our fingertips is transforming government, business, and many other aspects of society. Topics include search advertising and auctions, search and privacy, search ranking, internationalization, anti-spam efforts, local search, peer-to-peer search, and search of blogs and online communities. The Instructor, Dr. Marti Hearst, is an associate professor in the School of Information at UC Berkeley, with an affiliate appointment in the Computer Science Division.

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