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2014 AP Summer Assignments

2014 AP Summer Assignments

Author: Susan Nygaard
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Tutorial

Syllabus

Check back later in the summer for the AP Lit & Comp Syllabus! My email is snygaard@marshallschool.org

 

Turnitin.com enrollment info

Turnitin.com AP LIT class ID for 2014/2015 is 8055546; Password is F109. Due date for both assignments is 11:59 am on Tuesday, August 5. (You can upload your work beginning on July 1, if that works better for you.)

AP Lit Summer Texts

There are two main texts I want you to read over the summer:

Othello (1603-4) by William Shakespeare (electronic copy),
 

Note:  In Othello, you can skip the section in Act 2, Scene 1 that runs from line 91 through 182.  (Most scholars think this section was not written by Shakespeare, but added by someone else later.)

 

I do have hard copies of Othello if you would like...

 

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798) by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (electronic copy).

 

Links to a semi-animated film of the poem (in four parts) that uses Gustave Doré's famous illustrations and features Orson Welles reading the poem:

http://youtu.be/4EpuaCaPML8

http://youtu.be/j6TYaeI-NKQ

http://youtu.be/DKk43D5W_K8

http://youtu.be/yqDxAFW7jL4

 

A strange & lovely little film about the poem:

http://av.vimeo.com/15619/927/29498200.mp4?token=1369182511_7bd7513d2649b464ffa4a35f83a450f2

Coleridge Assignment

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Shakespeare Assignment

We will do some in-class work with Shakespeare during the first two weeks of school, and then we will come back to this play in the spring.

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Shakespearean Language Tips

Thou = you (Thou beslubbering elf-skinned hedge-pig!)

Thy = your (Give me thy hand)

Thine = yours (This book is thine)

Art = are (Thou art a twisted bunch-back’d toad!)

ist=is it

to’t=to it

Dost=do

Doth=does

An = if

Ay (pronounced “I”) = yes

 

Common Shakespearean Words

Common Shakespearean Words

anon—right now, OR “I come right away”……. “Anon, good nurse! Speak!”

art—are, OR skill……“Thou art dead; no physician’s art can save you..”

dost or doth—does or do……“Dost thou know the time?”

ere—before……“We must leave ere daybreak.”

fain—gladly……“I fain would bake Dr Nygaard cookies if I could get an A.”

fie—an exclamation of dismay or disgust……“You cheated? Fie upon it!” OR “Fie! Are you mad?”

hark—listen……. “Hark to the owl,” OR “Hark! The herald angels sing!”

hence—away…..“Get thee hence, beggar!” OR “We must hence before the army arrives.”

hie—hurry……“Hie thee hence, or lose your life!”

hither—here…..“Come hither, young lad.”

thither—there……“Look to the east—thither doth the sun arise.”

hath—has……… “He hath killed many a man.” OR “He hath a horse.”

ho—hey (roughly equivalent). “Lucius, ho!” [Brutus calling his servant]

mark—pay attention to…….. “Mark my words.”

marry—indeed……“He says I should respond quickly; marry, I want to.”

pray/prithee—a polite way of asking something……“I prithee answer the question.”

saucy—cheeky; sassy……“Hence, thou saucy boy!”

sirrah—a term of address used for inferiors……“Sirrah, bring the letter over here.”

thee—you……“When will I see thee next?”

thou—you……“Thou art a villain.”

thy—your……“Thy name is more hateful than thy face.”

whence—from where…….. “Whence came that news?” OR “Return to whence you came.”

wherefore—why……“Wherefore dost thou leave?” OR “Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?”[As in, “why can’t you be someone else, whom my family doesn’t hate?”]

SOURCE: FROM THE BATH CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT, ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

Source: From the Bath Central School District, English Department

Reading Shakespeare's Language

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Note:  Students in the 2013/4 AP class had four assignments, related to three texts, for their summer work.