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3 Major Cloud Types

3 Major Cloud Types

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Author: Silvia Silveira
Description:

Learning Objective: Students will be able to collect data throughout the week to show how the motion and complex interactions of air changes the weather we have every day

This lesson is made specifically for Third Grade students. It introduces the 3 Major Types of Clouds with great ease. This lesson allows the students to gradually take control of the lesson and learn on their own. There is a hands on activity that the students are able to that allows them to do some arts and crafts activity. 

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Tutorial

Did you know that a basic understanding of the clouds can help you predict the weather? Its true. Cumulonimbus clouds are a sign of rain and cirrus clouds often indicate a change in the weather.

Source: The Three Main Clouds - Cirrus, Stratus, Cumulus. (n.d.). Retrieved February 7, 2015, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32uFVssBs6E

3 Major Cloud Type

3 Major Cloud Types

Area of Science: Earth Science

Grade Level: Third Grade

Academic Standards to be met:

California State Science Content Area: Earth Science:

4: Objects in the sky move in regular and predictable patterns: (e. Students know the position of the Sun in the sky changes during the course of the day and from season to season)

Next Generation Science Standards:

MS-ES S2-5: Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air results in changes in weather conditions.

Common Core Standards/ELA/ELD:

ELA/ Literacy: RL3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.  

Learning Objective: Students will be able to collect data throughout the week to show how the motion and complex interactions of air changes the weather we have every day

Materials: Blue construction paper, Cotton Balls, Markers, Glue

Adaptations: For both English Learners and Special Needs students the class discussion, pictures and the hands-on activity will help them reinforce the learning objective. They are able to learn with the whole class instead of individually.

Key Concepts: Clouds, Stratus, Cumulus, Cirrus

Five Step Lesson Plan Format:

Anticipatory Set: Preview-Review Approach: I’ll review things that students see in the sky during the day and at night. I’ll focus on clouds and have them describe the clouds to me. I’ll explain to the students that they will be learning about different types of clouds.

Instructional Process: (Using the Cloud Presentation)

I do, you watch: I’ll go over all three types of clouds: how they look like, what they mean, and when you see them. Also, use the YouTube Video, that helps visually see what it is that we are talking about: linked here -> The Three Main Clouds - Cirrus, Stratus, Cumulus
I do, you help: I’ll review again the types of clouds together as a class. I’ll ask questions if necessary so that the students remember the information that was given to them about the different types of clouds.
I do, you tell: Now that I have gone over the cloud types twice, the students will tell me what to write on poster paper that will stay up during the lesson.

Guided Practice:

You do, I help: I’ll describe to the class a type of cloud and let them think about the type of cloud it is before answering. I’ll give several descriptions of each and allow all of them time to think about what type of cloud it is. All of this is done verbally (no need for paper or pencils).
You do it yourself: As a fun hands-on activity, the students will make all three types of clouds on blue construction paper with cotton balls so that they may have it as review and hands on visual of the clouds. I’ll make sure that they do the clouds the same way as they are described.

Closure/ Evaluation/ Assessment:

I’ll summarize what we have learned by quickly going over the posters. I’ll use the Independent Practice Worksheet to see if the students have understood the lesson objective. I’ll have the students write down what they know about the different types of clouds that we talked about in the lesson.  

Independent Practice:

Handout the worksheet. This worksheet helps the students summarize and write down what they remember of each type of cloud. This worksheet will also work as the assessment for the lesson.

Homework/ Extended Practice: 

I’ll send the students home with an objective: to look up at the sky as they continue their day at school and at home and note the different types of clouds they see in the sky. The next day they will get together to talk about what they saw/ observed in the sky.  

 

Source: The Three Main Clouds - Cirrus, Stratus, Cumulus. (n.d.). Retrieved February 7, 2015, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32uFVssBs6E