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Behavioral-Based Interviews

Behavioral-Based Interviews

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Behavioral-Based Interviews

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Developing Effective Teams

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Tutorial

what's covered
This lesson will introduce behavioral-based interviews. Specifically, it will cover:
  1. Defining Behavioral-Based Interviews
  2. Reasons to Use Behavioral-Based Interviews
  3. Behavioral-Based Interview Process
  4. Reflect

1. Defining Behavioral-Based Interviews

A candidate's cultural fit is often just as important as their skill set, but more difficult to screen for. Behavioral interviewing, which involves probing into a candidate's past behavior to predict their future behavior and performance, gives recruiters or interviewers a reliable indication of whether or not a candidate will succeed in a specific role and carries the significant added benefit of helping minimize the influence of unconscious bias (Srinivasan & Humes, 2017).

Indeed, behavioral interviews can be used to assess a wide variety of competencies, such as coachability, adaptability, and willingness to collaborate. Not to be confused with a skills fit interview in which you may ask candidates to grapple with a new problem, the behavioral interview is a close look at their problem-solving process.


2. Reasons to Use Behavioral-Based Interviews

There are several reasons why behavioral interviewing techniques remain in use today.

Reason Explanation
Unprecedented Transparency According to Srinivasan and Humes, the interview panel is back-to-back sessions with prospective colleagues. This type of interviewing can be a painful experience for the candidate as prospective colleagues do not always put enough time in to review the candidates' resume and questions they will be asking.
Rise of Diversity and Inclusion By providing interviewers the tools to focus on what matters–an individual’s suitability for the role, as demonstrated by their past behavior and experience–organizations can help end bias and increase the chances of qualified candidates getting the appropriate level of consideration, regardless of their background (Srinivasan & Humes).
Effective Behavioral interviewing works. According to Srinivasan and Humes, behavioral interviewing can be 55% predictive of future on-the-job behavior, while traditional interviewing is only 10% predictive.


3. Behavioral-Based Interview Process

For the interviewing process, your team will want to establish a rapport with the candidate by:

  • Introducing yourself and describing your position and major responsibilities.
  • Expressing appreciation for the candidate's interest and time.
  • Request clarifying information from the candidate's application/resume if needed.
When conducting an interview using behavioral-based questions you want to:
  • Listen for the event, action, and result (EAR) in the response for each question.
  • Ask clarifying or follow-up questions to complete the EAR for each question.
  • Use EAR notes to assist you in scoring when the interview is completed.

Video Transcription

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Behavioral interviewing involves probing into a candidate's past behavior to predict their future behavior and performance. Now, unlike a skills fit interview where candidates are asked to grapple with a new problem, the behavioral interview is a close look at their problem-solving process. This allows recruiters or interviewers to assess a wide variety of competencies such as coachability, adaptability, and willingness to collaborate, which provides a reliable indication of whether or not a candidate will succeed in a specific role.

For the interviewing process, it's important to establish a rapport with the candidate. To do that, the interviewers begin by introducing themselves and describing their own position and major responsibilities. Next, they should express appreciation for the candidate's interest and time and request clarifying information from the candidate's application or resume if needed.

Now, behavioral-based questions usually require the candidate to think of a time when they displayed a specific quality and start telling a short story in three parts-- the event that responds to the question, the actions they took to deal with the event, and the concrete results of their actions, including accomplishments, awards, improvement, and what they learned or would do differently next time.

This is usually abbreviated as EAR. If necessary, the interviewers may ask clarifying or follow-up questions to complete the EAR for each question. During the process, it's helpful to keep EAR notes since they can assist in scoring the candidate when the interview is completed.

There are several reasons why behavioral interviewing techniques should be used over other forms of interview. The first reason is unprecedented transparency. Traditional panel interviews involve back-to-back sessions with prospective colleagues. This can be a painful experience for the candidate as prospective colleagues did not always put enough time in to review the candidate's resume and questions they'll be asking.

A second reason to use behavioral interviewing is to promote diversity and inclusion. Behavioral interviewing provides interviewers the tools to focus on what matters, which is an individual's suitability for the role as demonstrated by their past behavior and experience. This can help organizations reduce bias during hiring and increase the chances of qualified candidates getting the appropriate level of consideration regardless of their background.

Third, research has shown that in contrast with traditional interviewing which seems to be only 10% predictive of future on-the-job behavior, behavioral interviewing can be 55% predictive.


4. Reflect

Consider the questions below based on the following pillars.

reflect

  • People:Think of a time when you had a miscommunication with a team member or patient. How did you handle the situation? What was the outcome?
  • Quality: What has been one of the most difficult decisions you have had to make on the job? What facts did you consider? How did you reach your decision?
  • Service: Consider a time when you exceeded a patient/customer of family member’s expectations. What was the situation and what did you do?
You are an entry-level RN who was asked by your Nurse Manager to sit in and help conduct an interview to hire a nurse for the first shift.

reflect
Based on the answers to the above questions, do you think you would make the correct decision on who to hire?


Authored by Kerrie Roberson, DHA, MBA, MSN, BSN, RN-BC, CMSRN, WAAD