Ch 6.1 Ionic Bonding

Ch 6.1 Ionic Bonding

Author: deirdre carney
  • Recognize stable electron configurations
  • Predict an element's properties using number of valence electrons and electron dot diagrams
  • Describe how an ionic bond forms and how ionization energy affects the process
  • Predict the composition of an ionic compound from its chemical formula
  • Relate the properties of ionic compounds to the structure of crystal lattices

Nevada Science Standards

P.12.A.4 Students know atoms bond with one another by transferring or sharing electrons. E/S 

P.12.A.9 Students know the number of electrons in an atom determines whether the atom is electrically neutral or an ion. I/S 

Next Generation Science Standards

HS-PS1-a Evaluate the merits of different atomic and molecular representations based on their ability to explain a given property of matter or phenomenon

HS-PS1-b Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outer energy levels of atoms

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Dogs Teaching Chemical Bonding

Ch 6.1 Ionic Bonding

Read Chapter 6.1 Ionic Bonding
Outline the reading in your Science Notebook & include major points and diagrams/tables.
You should focus on the following essential questions:
- When is an atom unlikely to react
- What is one way elements can achieve stable electron configuration
-How does the structure of an ionic compound affect its properties

Full Screen

Source: Prentice Hall Physical Science - Concepts in Action

video clip: Introduction to Ionic Bonding

This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together.

Take notes in your Science Notebook.

Video clip: Ionic Bonding Part 2

We'll look at the details of ionic bonding, using sodium chloride as an example. Both atoms have unfilled valence shells, which are the outermost energy level. Electrons are transferred from the metal to the nonmetal, creating ions with an opposite charge. The atoms are then held together because of the attraction between the opposite charges

Take notes in your science notebook.

Ionic Bonding FAQ: Valence Electrons 1

Tyler Dewitt answers some common questions about valence electrons and ionic bonds.

Take notes in your Science Notebook

Video clip: Drawing Lewis Dot Diagrams

Mr. Andersen shows you how to draw Lewis Dot Diagrams for atoms and simple molecules.

Be sure to copy examples with steps in your Science notebook.

Online - Interactive activity: Ionic Bonding

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Practice creating ionic bonds.