+
Chapter 24: Antihyperlipidemic Agents Test Bank

Chapter 24: Antihyperlipidemic Agents Test Bank

Rating:
Rating
(0)
Author: brecht 2017
Description:

http://homework.plus/chapter-24-antihyperlipidemic-agents-test-bank/

Chapter 24: Antihyperlipidemic Agents
Test Bank
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1.   The primary care nurse practitioner (NP) sees a patient for a physical examination and orders laboratory tests that reveal low-density lipoprotein (LDL) of 100 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) of 30 mg/dL, and triglycerides of 350 mg/dL. The patient has no previous history of coronary heart disease. The NP should consider prescribing:
a.

ezetimibe (Zetia).

b.

gemfibrozil (Lopid).

c.

simvastatin (Zocor).

d.

nicotinic acid (Niaspan).

2.   A primary care NP sees a 46-year-old male patient and orders a fasting lipoprotein profile that reveals LDL of 190 mg/dL, HDL of 40 mg/dL, and triglycerides of 200 mg/dL. The patient has no previous history of coronary heart disease, but the patient’s father developed coronary heart disease at age 55 years. The NP should prescribe:
a.

atorvastatin (Lipitor).

b.

gemfibrozil (Lopid).

c.

cholestyramine (Questran).

d.

lovastatin/niacin (Advicor).

3.   A patient who has hyperlipidemia has been taking atorvastatin (Lipitor) 60 mg daily for 6 months. The patient’s initial lipid profile showed LDL of 180 mg/dL, HDL of 45 mg/dL, and triglycerides of 160 mg/dL. The primary care NP orders a lipid profile today that shows LDL of 105 mg/dL, HDL of 50 mg/dL, and triglycerides of 120 mg/dL. The patient reports muscle pain and weakness. The NP should:
a.

order liver function tests (LFTs).

b.

order a creatine kinase-MM (CK-MM) level.

c.

change atorvastatin to twice-daily dosing.

d.

add gemfibrozil (Lopid) to the patient’s medication regimen.

4.   A patient who has primary hyperlipidemia and who takes atorvastatin (Lipitor) continues to have LDL cholesterol of 140 mg/dL after 3 months of therapy. The primary care NP increases the dose from 10 mg daily to 20 mg daily. The patient reports headache and dizziness a few weeks after the dose increase. The NP should:
a.

change the atorvastatin dose to 15 mg twice daily.

b.

change the patient’s medication to cholestyramine (Questran).

c.

add ezetimibe (Zetia) and lower the atorvastatin to 10 mg daily.

d.

recommend supplements of omega-3 along with the atorvastatin.

5.   A 55-year-old woman has a history of myocardial infarction (MI). A lipid profile reveals LDL of 130 mg/dL, HDL of 35 mg/dL, and triglycerides 150 mg/dL. The woman is sedentary with a body mass index of 26. The woman asks the primary care NP about using a statin medication. The NP should:
a.

recommend dietary and lifestyle changes first.

b.

begin therapy with atorvastatin 10 mg per day.

c.

discuss quality-of-life issues as part of the decision to begin medication.

d.

tell her there is no clinical evidence of efficacy of statin medication in her case.

6.   A patient who has diabetes is taking simvastatin (Zocor) 80 mg daily to treat LDL cholesterol level of 170 mg/dL. The patient has a body mass index of 29. At a follow-up visit, the patient’s LDL level is 120 mg/dL. The primary care NP should consider:
a.

increasing the simvastatin to 80 mg twice daily.

b.

adding nicotinic acid to the patient’s drug regimen.

c.

changing the medication to ezetimibe/simvastatin (Vytorin).

d.

referring the patient to a dietitian for assistance with weight reduction.

7.   A patient who has type 2 diabetes mellitus will begin taking a bile acid sequestrant. Which bile acid sequestrant should the primary care NP order?
a.

Colesevelam (Welchol)

b.

Colestipol (Colestid)

c.

Cholestyramine (Questran)

d.

Cholestyramine (Questran Light)

8.   A patient with primary hypercholesterolemia is taking an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. All of the patient’s baseline LFTs were normal. At a 6-month follow-up visit, the patient reports occasional headache. A lipid profile reveals a decrease of 20% in the patient’s LDL cholesterol. The NP should:
a.

order LFTs.

b.

order CK-MM tests.

c.

consider decreasing the dose of the medication.

d.

reassure the patient that this side effect is common.


(more)
See More
Try a College Course Free

Sophia’s self-paced online courses are a great way to save time and money as you earn credits eligible for transfer to over 2,000 colleges and universities.*

Begin Free Trial
No credit card required

25 Sophia partners guarantee credit transfer.

221 Institutions have accepted or given pre-approval for credit transfer.

* The American Council on Education's College Credit Recommendation Service (ACE Credit®) has evaluated and recommended college credit for 20 of Sophia’s online courses. More than 2,000 colleges and universities consider ACE CREDIT recommendations in determining the applicability to their course and degree programs.

Tutorial