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Chapter 33: Male Genitourinary Agents Test Bank

Chapter 33: Male Genitourinary Agents Test Bank

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Chapter 33: Male Genitourinary Agents
Test Bank
MULTIPLE CHOICE
1.   A man who has benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH), in whom prostate carcinoma has been ruled out, asks the primary care nurse practitioner (NP) about beginning drug therapy to treat his symptoms. The NP notes that he consistently has blood pressure readings around 145/90 mm Hg. The NP should prescribe:
a.

tadalafil (Cialis).

b.

doxazosin (Cardura).

c.

tamsulosin (Flomax).

d.

finasteride (Proscar).

2.   A patient who has BPH is taking tamsulosin and dutasteride and asks the primary care NP why he needs to take both medications. The NP should tell him:
a.

the combination helps reduce the risk of prostate carcinoma.

b.

two-drug therapy is required before corrective prostatectomy surgery.

c.

both drugs are given so that smaller doses of each drug may be administered.

d.

one gives faster symptom relief, whereas the other shrinks the size of the prostate.

3.   A patient who has BPH is taking alfuzosin (Uroxatral) and finasteride (Proscar). The patient has had two urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the past 2 months. A urinalysis in the clinic is negative for leukocyte esterase but positive for hematuria. The primary care NP should:
a.

discontinue finasteride.

b.

refer the patient to a urologist.

c.

change alfuzosin to tamsulosin.

d.

add doxazosin to the drug regimen.

4.   A patient who has BPH is taking doxazosin and finasteride. The patient asks the primary care NP whether he has an increased risk of prostate cancer. The NP should tell him:
a.

his overall cancer risk is increased.

b.

he has an increased risk of a certain type of cancer.

c.

his cancer risk is the same as any other man his age.

d.

doxazosin will increase his cancer risk, but only slightly.

5.   A patient tells the primary care NP that he has difficulty getting and maintaining an erection. The NP’s initial response should be to:
a.

prescribe sildenafil (Viagra).

b.

perform a medication history.

c.

evaluate his cardiovascular status.

d.

order a papaverine injection test to screen for erectile dysfunction.

6.   The primary care NP is preparing to prescribe sildenafil for a man who has erectile dysfunction. The NP should remember to tell this patient:
a.

to avoid oral nitrates while taking this medication.

b.

that the drug may cause penile aching.

c.

to use a condom if his sexual partner is pregnant.

d.

dyspepsia may occur and may warrant discontinuation of the drug.

7.   A man who has cardiovascular disease and takes nitroglycerin for angina pain develops erectile dysfunction. The primary care NP who cares for this patient should recommend:
a.

sildenafil (Viagra).

b.

testosterone injections.

c.

vascular reconstruction surgery.

d.

use of a vacuum constriction device.

8.   A patient who has erectile dysfunction wants a medication to use as needed. The primary care NP should recommend:
a.

tadalafil (Cialis).

b.

sildenafil (Viagra).

c.

avanafil (Stendra).

d.

vardenafil (Levitra).


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