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Civil Rights Movement

Civil Rights Movement

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Eleventh Grade (11th Grade)

CCSS -- Social Science\History

  • 11.10 Students analyze the development of federal civil rights and voting rights.

    • 4. Examine the roles of civil rights advocates (e.g., A. Philip Randolph, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcom X, Thurgood Marshall, James Farmer, Rosa Parks), including the significance of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” and “I Have a Dream” speech.
    • 6. Analyze the passage and effects of civil rights and voting rights legislation (e.g., 1964 Civil Rights Act, Voting Rights Act of 1965) and the Twenty-Fourth Amendment, with an emphasis on equality of access to education and to the political process.


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Tutorial

Today, Students will be learning about the Civil Rights movement, the famous advocates who played a part in creating change as well as the various legislative acts that made a difference in voting rights.


Eleventh Grade (11th Grade) Lesson

CCSS -- Social Science\History

  • 11.10 Students analyze the development of federal civil rights and voting rights.

    • 4. Examine the roles of civil rights advocates (e.g., A. Philip Randolph, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcom X, Thurgood Marshall, James Farmer, Rosa Parks), including the significance of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail” and “I Have a Dream” speech.
    • 6. Analyze the passage and effects of civil rights and voting rights legislation (e.g., 1964 Civil Rights Act, Voting Rights Act of 1965) and the Twenty-Fourth Amendment, with an emphasis on equality of access to education and to the political process.

Some of the Leaders of the Civil Rights Movement

Leaders in this video include; Martin Luther King Jr, Malcolm X, Rosa Parks.

Explore Civil Right Leaders

Be sure to pay close attention to the various videos and sub-stories available for viewing.


http://www.pbs.org/black-culture/explore/civil-rights-leaders/#.Vmn_suOfrGc

Biographies of Famous Civil Rights Advocates

People to Know

Please look through the various biographies of famous civil rights advocates. Make sure to view some of the videos located on the individual biographies listed at the bottom of the webpage; they may have some interesting details and you may never know what you learn.

Keep in mind, not all civil rights advocates were male or African American. Some of the most famous advocates can be remembered as being female or Caucasian.


Thurgood Marshall:

http://www.biography.com/people/thurgood-marshall-...


James Farmer:

http://www.biography.com/people/james-farmer-21349...


Rosa Parks:

http://www.biography.com/people/rosa-parks-9433715


Martin Luther King Jr:

http://www.biography.com/people/martin-luther-king...


Malcolm X:

http://www.biography.com/people/malcolm-x-9396195


A. Philip Randolph:

http://www.biography.com/people/a-philip-randolph-...

Martin Luther King Jr, "I Have A Dream Speech"

A Letter From Birmingham Jail (Original Copy)

The actual letter Martin Luther King Jr wrote in the Birmingham Jail he was held in after being arrested.

http://okra.stanford.edu/transcription/document_images/undecided/630416-019.pdf

Understanding A Letter From Birmingham Jail

The Civil Rights Act Of 1964 Explained

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was set in place by President John F. Kennedy on June 11, 1963. This act helped end racial segregation and outlawed most forms of discrimination in the workplace, schools, public facilities, etc. In some ways, it also helped clarify some women’s rights. The Civil Rights Act ultimately ended unequal application of voter registration requirements it once pushed into agenda.

It was President Kennedy’s dream to make a difference during this time;

"giving all Americans the right to be served in facilities which are open to the public—hotels, restaurants, theaters, retail stores, and similar establishments," as well as "greater protection for the right to vote.” — JFK

History: The Civil Rights Act of 1964

Civil Rights Act

Visit this website in order to receive some more information about The Civil Rights Act of 1964

Bridging History: Selma and the Voting Rights Act of 1965

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was one of the most significant pieces of civil rights legislation to be signed into law on August 6, 1965. It was to reinforce and expand what was already created into a law; this was the fifteenth amendment. Racial discrimination could no longer prevent Americans from voting. If one was found violating the law, they would be prosecuted.

The Twenty-Fourth Amendment


Did You Know

Believe it or not, there was once a time when citizens in some states had to pay a fee to vote in a national election. This fee was known as a poll tax.

On January 23, 1964, the United States ratified the 24th Amendment to the Constitution, prohibiting any poll tax in elections for federal officials.

The Big Question!

Think About It

How did the Civil Rights Movement help make a difference in legislation changes that were made in connection to Voting Rights?


First Task: Write a paragraph explaining what was life was like before the Civil Rights Movement took place and what life was like after the Civil Rights Movement established itself. Focus on the idea of what citizens dealt with on a day to day basis. How did life change in that sense. Was it better? Worse? Explain and Support your findings using evidence.

  • Place your written paragraph in the comments box at the bottom Be sure to include your name and a title for your writing.

Second Task: Write an essay comparing and contrasting two separate individuals who were working toward creating change during the Civil Rights Movement. Explain what their common source of interest was and what strategies they used in order to make a difference. Prove how their accomplishments and work helped benefit the cause as well as how it connected to creating change with voting rights\legislations concerning these ideas.

  • This assignment will be written and turned in later using a GoggleDoc's Document.