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Competing

Competing

Description:

At the end of this tutorial, the learner will understand how the competing conflict style presents itself in various situations

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Tutorial

What's Covered


As you learned in a previous lesson, there are five different conflict styles. This lesson will discuss one of these styles, and how it presents itself in various situations.

The areas of focus include:

  1. Competing as a conflict style
  2. Positive/negative outcomes of competing

1. COMPETING AS A CONFLICT STYLE

As we’ve discussed before, competing is a conflict resolution style in which one party seeks to meet his or her own needs at the expense of another party's needs.

As a style, competing is:

  • High in assertiveness
  • Low in cooperation

If you remember, cooperativeness is a behavior in which two parties work together to achieve their goals; assertiveness is a behavior in which a party confidently makes a statement without need of proof, affirming his or her rights without attacking another’s.

As the concept of competing is based on the idea of clear winners and losers, it’s easy to see why this style favors a high amount of assertiveness and a low amount of cooperativeness.

Example War stands out as an example since it almost always involves a clear winner and loser.

Example Think about a boycott or other form of nonviolent resistance. You could be boycotting regulations that you don’t think are good for a particular group of people; you're trying to protect that group’s civil rights.

In this sense, you are competing against the powers that are trying to put regulations in place that you don't agree with.

Terms to Know

    • Competing
    • A conflict resolution style in which one party seeks to meet his/her own needs at the expense of another party’s needs.
    • Cooperativeness
    • Behavior in which two parties work in concert to achieve their mutual and respective individual goals.
    • Assertiveness
    • Behavior in which a person confidently makes a statement without need of proof, affirming his/her rights without attacking another’s.

2. POSITIVE/NEGATIVE OUTCOMES OF COMPETING

This particular style of conflict has, as all styles do, both positive and negative outcomes.

A positive outcome is a resolution to a conflict that a party perceives as meeting his or her needs and/or reducing the likelihood of further conflict.

A negative outcome is a resolution that the party perceives as not meeting his or her needs and/or increasing the likelihood of further conflict.

Example Return to the example of war.

    • Negative outcome: Violence is obviously a very large negative result here.
    • Positive outcome: Freedom can sometimes be a positive result. For example, the American Revolution led to the freedom in the United States.

Example Consider the scenario of nonviolent resistance.

    • Positive outcome: You preserve the rights of a particular group of people.
    • Negative outcome: Perhaps you don’t see any if you win this. You feel that this was a moral endeavor, and winning it is positive. You don’t consider there to be any negative outcomes here, and some cases, there really might not be.

Term to Know

    • Positive/Negative Outcomes
    • Resolutions to a conflict that a party perceives as meeting his/her needs and/or reducing likelihood of further conflict (positive) or not meeting his/her needs and/or increasing likelihood of further conflict (negative).

Big Idea

It’s important to remember that while competing might be the style that you tend towards and feel most comfortable with (your preferred style), that doesn't mean it's the only way that you can respond in a conflict.

There are other conflict styles, and you, as well as anyone, can respond in any number of ways to a particular conflict.


Summary


In this lesson, you learned about competing as a style of conflict, and what the positive and negative outcomes of using this style can be.

You now understand that even though competing may be your preferred style, you always have the ability to respond to conflict in a different way.

Good luck!

Source: Adapted from Sophia tutorial by Marlene Johnson.

TERMS TO KNOW
  • Competing

    A conflict resolution style in which one party seeks to meet his/her own needs at the expense of another party's needs.

  • Positive/Negative Outcomes

    Resolutions to a conflict that a party perceives as meeting his/her needs and/or reducing likelihood of further conflict (positive) or not meeting his/her needs and/or increasing likelihood of further conflict(negative).

  • Cooperativeness

    Behavior in which two parties work in concert to achieve their mutual and respective individual goals.

  • Assertiveness

    Behavior in which a person confidently makes a statement without need of proof, affirming his/her rights without attacking another's.