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Connecting clauses

Connecting clauses

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Author: Ben Creagh
Description:
  1.  

    Introduce independent/dependent clauses

  2.  

    Introduce simple, complex, compound, and compound-complex sentence types.

  3.  

    Explain how to join independent and dependent clauses by using a variety of subordinators (when, whether, etc.) to create complex sentences.

  4.  

    Explain how to join independent clauses by using a variety of conjunctive adverbs (however, therefore, etc.) to create compound sentences.

  5.  

    Explain how to join clauses together by using conjunctions to create complex, compound, and compound-complex sentences. 

 

This packet should help a learner seeking to understand how to vary sentence structure and who is confused about how to create complex sentences. It will explain how to connect clauses with a variety of techniques. 

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Tutorial

Independent and Dependent Clauses

 

A clause is a part of a sentence that has a subject and a predicate.  Or in other words it's a part of a sentence. 

To start this lesson we’ll talk about dependent and independent clauses.

I think of independent and dependent clauses like people. 

An independent person does not need others to help them survive, as is true with an independent person, or clause.  It is fine by itself and you can add ideas to it, but it is understandable without other support(dependent clause)

Example:

This book is good to read when you’re traveling.

[independent clause                  ]  [ dependent clause]

A dependent person, needs others to help them out.  Think of a baby.  They are dependent on their guardian.  This is like a dependent clause.  It is needs another clause to become complete. 

Example:

I sprinted         every day to the store.

 [independent]   [ dependent clause]

Do you see how each independent clause could be a perfectly fine sentence by itself, and the dependent clauses need something else to make a complete idea?

Source: Ben Creagh

Simple, Complex, Compound and Compound-Comples Sentences

A Simple sentence is equivalent to one independent clause, so it needs a subject and a predicate. 

Simple sentence : The rain would not stop.

                 Notice how this sentence has a subject(rain), and predicate (would not stop)

 

A complex sentence has one independent clause and at least one dependent clause.

Complex: After finishing off the last of the ice cream, Jane went to the store.

            Notice how the first clause of the sentence would not be supported without the second clause?

 

A compound sentence consists of at least two independent clauses but no dependent clauses.

Compound: Jane went to the store, but she couldn’t find any of her favorite candy.

 

A Compound-complex sentence consists of at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause.

Example:  After finishing off the last of the ice cream, Jane went to the store, but she couldn’t find any of her favorite candy.

Notice how the sentences keep getting a little longer and more involved.  With this understanding of sentence structure, we will better be able to place commas and other punctuation in the correct spot.

Source: Ben Creagh

Joining Independent and Dependent Clauses with Subordinators

To join independent and dependent clauses you can use a variety of subordinators.  To do this we need to attach a subordinator (when, whether, because, etc) to the front of a dependent clause.  It may be easier to look at this example:

 

Whether you eat broccoli or not, you need to get your recommended protein.

 

You need to get your recommended protein whether you eat broccoli or not.

 

 

Notice when you begin a sentence with a dependent clause, you need punctuation, but when an independent clause starts, punctuation is not necessary.

Source: Ben Creagh

Connecting Clauses with Conjuctions

We can easily string independent clauses together to form strong, rich sentences by using conjunctive adverbs(however, therefore, etc).  When using conjunctive adverbs we need to place a semicolon(;) before the conjunctive adverb to separate the two independent clauses. 

Eating a vegetarian diet is a healthy way to live; however, people are hesitant to cut meat from their diet. 

 

If we use coordinating conjunctions(FANBOYS…for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so), we can simply use a comma to separate the two clauses.

Using a coordinating conjunction:

Eating a vegetarian diet is a healthy way to live, but people are hesitant to cut meat from their diet. 

 

We can see that there are only seven conjunctions that we can use if we want to use a comma.

Source: Ben Creagh