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Discover Your Learning Style with VARK

Discover Your Learning Style with VARK

Author: Kristina Jacobs
Description:

To use the free VARK learning style assessment to establish the learner's strongest learning style and to learn more about the VARK learning styles.

This packet goes over the VARK learning style assessment. It gives information for each type of learning style including Read-Write, Auditory, Kinestetic and Visual.

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Tutorial

Why do I need to know my learning style?

Knowing your learning style can help you study more effectively, do better on tests, learn more from your classes and be more successful. The VARK learning style assessment can be a tool to help you discover your learning preference.

Some learners prefer to learn using visual information, others prefer to read a textbook and write notes in order to learn. Many people learn best in a kinesthetic environment where they can learn by doing with a hands on approach. Auditory learners remember most of what they hear.

Better Grades crossword graphic

Once you know your preference you won't be wasting your time learning and studying in ways that aren't as effective for your preferred learning style.

Source: Kristina Blasen, Image from http://www.puzzletainment.com/

Link to take the VARK Learning Style Assessment online for free

VARK pie chart

Click the link to take the VARK questionnaire online for FREE.

It should take you about 10 minutes.

It will tell you your preferred learning style.

http://www.vark-learn.com/english/page.asp?p=questionnaire

Visual Study Strategies (V) by Neil Fleming

Visual Study Strategies

visual
visual
visual
visual
visual
visual
visual

 

 

You want the whole picture so you are probably holistic rather than reductionist in your approach.. You are often swayed by the look of an object. You are interested in color and layout and design and you know where you are in your environment.  You are probably going to draw something.

Aural Study Strategies (A) by Neil Fleming

 

Dog listening big ears

Aural Study Strategies

If you have a strong preference for learning by Aural methods (A = hearing) you should use some or all of the following:

INTAKE

To take in the information:

  • attend classes
  • attend discussions and tutorials
  • discuss topics with others
  • discuss topics with your teachers
  • explain new ideas to other people
  • use a tape recorder
  • remember the interesting examples, stories, jokes...
  • describe the overheads, pictures and other visuals to somebody who was not there
  • leave spaces in your notes for later recall and 'filling'

SWOT - Study without tears

To make a learnable package:

Convert your "notes" into a learnable package by reducing them (3:1)

  • Your notes may be poor because you prefer to listen. You will need to expand your notes by talking with others and collecting notes from the textbook.
  • Put your summarized notes onto tapes and listen to them.
  • Ask others to 'hear' your understanding of a topic.
  • Read your summarized notes aloud.
  • Explain your notes to another 'aural' person.

OUTPUT

To perform well in any test, assignment or examination:

  • Imagine talking with the examiner.
  • Listen to your voices and write them down.
  • Spend time in quiet places recalling the ideas.
  • Practice writing answers to old exam questions.
  • Speak your answers aloud or inside your head.

 

 

You prefer to have this page explained to you.
The written words are not as valuable as those you hear.
You will probably go and tell somebody about this.

Read/Write Study Strategies (R & W) by Neil Fleming

Read write

Read/Write Study Strategies

If you have a strong preference for learning by Reading and Writing (R & W) learning you should use some or all of the following:

INTAKE

To take in the information:

  • lists
  • headings
  • dictionaries
  • glossaries
  • definitions
  • handouts
  • textbooks
  • readings - library
  • notes (often verbatim)
  • teachers who use words well and have lots of information in sentences and notes
  • essays
  • manuals (computing and laboratory)

SWOT - Study without tears

To make a learnable package:

Convert your "notes" into a learnable package by reducing them (3:1)

  • Write out the words again and again.
  • Read your notes (silently) again and again.
  • Rewrite the ideas and principles into other words.
  • Organize any diagrams, graphs ... into statements, e.g. "The trend is..."
  • Turn reactions, actions, diagrams, charts and flows into words.
  • Imagine your lists arranged in multiple choice questions.

OUTPUT

To perform well in any test, assignment or examination:

  • Write exam answers.
  • Practice with multiple choice questions.
  • Write paragraphs, beginnings and endings.
  • Write your lists (a,b,c,d,1,2,3,4).
  • Arrange your words into hierarchies and points.

 

 

You like this page because the emphasis is on words and lists.
You believe the meanings are within the words, so any talk is OK but this handout is better.
You are heading for the library.

Kinesthetic (K) Study Strategies by Neil Fleming

Science lab cartoon 

Kinesthetic Study Strategies

If you have a strong Kinesthetic preference for learning you should use some or all of the following:

INTAKE

To take in the information:

  • all your senses - sight, touch, taste, smell, hearing ...
  • laboratories
  • field trips
  • field tours
  • examples of principles
  • lecturers who give real-life examples
  • applications
  • hands-on approaches (computing)
  • trial and error
  • collections of rock types, plants, shells, grasses...
  • exhibits, samples, photographs...
  • recipes - solutions to problems, previous exam papers

SWOT - Study without tears

To make a learnable package:

Convert your "notes" into a learnable package by reducing them (3:1)

  • Your lecture notes may be poor because the topics were not 'concrete' or 'relevant'.
  • You will remember the "real" things that happened.
  • Put plenty of examples into your summary. Use case studies and applications to help with principles and abstract concepts.
  • Talk about your notes with another "K" person.
  • Use pictures and photographs that illustrate an idea.
  • Go back to the laboratory or your lab manual.
  • Recall the experiments, field trip...

OUTPUT

To perform well in any test, assignment or examination:

  • Write practice answers, paragraphs...
  • Role play the exam situation in your own room.

 

You want to experience the exam so that you can understand it.
The ideas on this page are only valuable if they sound practical, real, and relevant to you.
You need to do things to understand.

Multimodal Study Strategies by Neil Fleming

hands on thinking visually

 

According to the VARK website, over 60% of the people who take the VARK learning style assessment are multimodal.

This means that they have strong preferences across more than one learning style. Learners can be bimodal, or even trimodal.

For example, a VA person (bimodal) has a preference for visual and auditory information. In this case, this person should follow the study recommendations for both visual learners and auditory learners.

 

Here is another example: a VRK person would be considered trimodal, meaning they have equal preference across three different learning styles; in this case, visual, read-write and kinesthetic. Trimodal learners should pick the study recommendations from each learning style that work the best for them.