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4 Tutorials that teach Erickson's Stages of Psychosocial Development: Trust vs. Mistrust through Industry vs. Inferiority
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Erickson's Stages of Psychosocial Development: Trust vs. Mistrust through Industry vs. Inferiority

Erickson's Stages of Psychosocial Development: Trust vs. Mistrust through Industry vs. Inferiority

Author: Barbara Ludins
Description:

This lesson will define, describe, and explain Erickson's Theory of Psychosocial Development. The first four stages, age at each stage, will be identified and explained.

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Tutorial
TERMS TO KNOW
  • Erickson's Theory of Psychosocial Development

    Individuals face psychosocial dilemmas faced throughout the lifetime as one manages internal and external demands.

  • Trust vs. Mistrust (0-2 years)

    Infants either gain trust in a predictable, loving, caring environment or mistrust from your parent/caregiver.

  • Autonomy vs. Shame/Doubt (2-3 years)

    Children must develop sense of independence, explore their environment, be able to have free choice If this independence is not given, the child will feel shame and doubt (question their own independence).

  • Initiative vs. Guilt (3-5 years)

    Child is more assertive, curious, and takes more initiative. Guilt is developed if the child is punished for initiative.

  • Industry vs. Inferiority (6-12 years)

    Kids deal with new school and social demands. Success leads to competence and failure leads to inferiority.