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Hamlets Soliloquy

Hamlets Soliloquy

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Author: Briana Ioane
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Common Core Standard for Grades 9-10:

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

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Tutorial

The BIG Question

Watch this video FIRST! It is your directions for this assignment.
Have fun!

Shakespeare's Hamlet

Act 3 Scene 1: Hamlets "To be or not to be" Soliloquy

To be, or not to be? That is the question—

Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer

The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,

Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,

And, by opposing, end them? To die, to sleep—

No more—and by a sleep to say we end

The heartache and the thousand natural shocks

That flesh is heir to—’tis a consummation

Devoutly to be wished! To die, to sleep.

To sleep, perchance to dream—ay, there’s the rub,

For in that sleep of death what dreams may come

When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,

Must give us pause. There’s the respect

That makes calamity of so long life.

For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,

Th' oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,

The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,

The insolence of office, and the spurns

That patient merit of th' unworthy takes,

When he himself might his quietus make

With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear,

To grunt and sweat under a weary life,

But that the dread of something after death,

The undiscovered country from whose bourn

No traveler returns, puzzles the will

And makes us rather bear those ills we have

Than fly to others that we know not of?

Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,

And thus the native hue of resolution

Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought,

And enterprises of great pith and moment

With this regard their currents turn awry,

And lose the name of action.—Soft you now,

The fair Ophelia!—Nymph, in thy orisons

Be all my sins remembered.

Source: Shakespeare's Hamlet

Hamlet's Soliloquy

Watch this video of Hamlet performing his soliloquy "To be or not to be" from Act 3 Scene 1

Source: "Hamlet Act3, Scene1 Soliloquy." YouTube. YouTube. Web. 19 Oct. 2014. .

Hamlet's Soliloquy 2

Now watch this version of Hamlets Soliloquy "To be or not to be" in Act 3 Scene 1

Source: "Hamlet - To Be Or Not To Be - Mel Gibson." YouTube. YouTube. Web. 19 Oct. 2014. .