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Incorporating quotes in your writing

Incorporating quotes in your writing

Author: Ryan Howard
Description:
  1.  

    Introduce quotes, why they are used in writing, and how to incorporate them in the introduction, body, or conclusion.

  2.  

    Explain how to effectively embed quotes within a paragraph and support them with insights or paraphrasing. 

 

This packet should help a learner seeking to understand English writing style and who is confused about to effectively incorporate quotes in a paragraph. It will explain how to support and embed quotes with appropriate style.   

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Tutorial

Introduction to Quotations ""

Quotations (or "quotes" as they may be called in speech) are words or phrases taken from a text or speech and placed by someone other than the original author. 

E.g. "Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation...." would be a quotation from Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.

 

Purposes of Quotations

Quotations are used for the following:

  • explain exactly what another author said 
  • to separate the dialogue of a character from the author's text as in a narration.
  • name the title of an essay, short story, book chapter, or TV series. 
  • provide a sense of irony in the writing (e.g. Jim shared his "knowledge" of the Vietnam War with his nephews.)
  • nicknames and false titles (Nat "King" Cole)
  • mentioning a particular word (The word "rodeo" is derived from the Spanish language.)

 

Inocorporating Quotations in the Introduction, Body, and Conclusion of an essay

It is fine to incorporate quotations in your paper, but it is also important to know how to do it properly.

 

Quotations in the Introduction - Because it is YOUR paper, the first sentence of the introductory paragraph should be your own.  After that, you may put in one or two quotations. 

E.g. My art is the very means of my existence.  There is barely a day that passes when I do not create art in one form or another.  As artist Henry Moore stated, "There's no retirement for an artist, it's your way of living so there's no end to it." 

Notice how the author puts their own words into the first two sentences and uses a quotation in the third sentence to illustrate the point they are making.  

What if one were to incorporate a quotation in  the first sentence in the introductory paragraph?

E.g.  "We have nothing to fear but fear itself,"  said President Franklin D. Roosevelt.   This statement is quite true if one takes the time to think about it.  If one is striving for a degree from a college or university, for example, the only thing that scares them is the fear of failing. 

That does not sound very original does it?

Nor should the body of a paper begin with a quote.  It should be the writer's own words.

The conclusion of a paper should NEVER have quotations in the last sentence.  The reason for this is because a conclusion is used to summarize what was mentioned in the entire paper.  Hence, it should be the words of the writer and not those of someone else. 

 

 

Where do the Quotations Go?

 

Add the quotations where they would go in the following sentences:

 

We are going to be late for the party, said Julie.

The city of Chicago is actually named for the term chicageau, meaning stinky onion.

Tom's philosphy about procrastination is not exactly what I want my children to learn.

John, said Sadie, Are you feeling better this morning?

For your assignment, I would like you to read the short story Lucy and the Horse.

Ned watched Friends on DVD last night.

I am going to collect an autographed baseball from Kenny the Bull Taylor.

Conclusion

In this packet, you have learned:

 

Quotations are used for:

  • explain exactly what another author said
  • to separate the dialogue of a character from the author's text as in a narration.
  • name the title of an essay, short story, book chapter, or TV series.
  • provide a sense of irony in the writing (e.g. Jim shared his "knowledge" of the Vietnam War with his nephews.)
  • nicknames and false titles (Nat "King" Cole)
  • mentioning a particular word (The word "rodeo" is derived from the
  • Spanish language.)

 

It is best to begin the first sentence of an introductory paragraph with one's own words.

It is best to conclude the last sentence of  an essay in one's own words.

Quotations should flow smoothly and blend in with the essay, not be placed randomly for the sake of being there.

Quotations that are three or more lines long should be embedded five spaces from the margin without quotation marks.

Introduce quotations with words such as "comments," "adds," "states," or "explains."

The word "quotes" should NEVER be used in writing.  "Quotes" is a slang term that is short for the proper word "quotations."