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Integrating Technology in 1:1 Instruction

Integrating Technology in 1:1 Instruction

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Author: Joshua Arbogast
Description:

In this tutorial we will:

  • Discuss the purpose and utility of UbD, standards, and competencies in establishing unit objectives within the context of teaching.
  • Analyze the various theories in 1:1 instruction
  • Develop 3-5 unit objectives and essential questions aligned and integrated with appropriate learning theories
  • Reflect on how the unit objectives drive decision-making related to technology, pedagogy, and content.
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Tutorial

Brainstorm


How could you use UbD, standards, and competencies in your classroom? 

1:1 Theories and Classroom Application

1:1 Technology Learning Theories Application to Classroom
Constructivism In a constructivist classroom, students might be able to choose a topic for a research project that interests them.
Problem-based Learning I often think of design thinking as a type of problem-based learning, where students are presented with a real-world problem such as poverty and are challenged to design a way to fix poverty in their own community. 
Cognitive Flexibility Theory This theory offers the opportunity to apply student think in various settings, by applying the principles of the Industrial Revolution to challenge students to identify and compare markers to a modern day industrial revolution.
Social Learning Theory Simple collaborative groups in the classroom where students can listen, observe, and model each other can be beneficial to English Language Learners (ELLS) who are beginning to use academic language.
Networked Learning Theory This theory could be used to connect with experts in the field or students around the world. Dreamwakers helped connect my classroom of world history students to listen and ask questions of a real-life diplomat. 
SAMR SAMR pushes teachers to use technology in various ways gradually until they are "redefining" the way that they use technology in new and creative ways. One example would be how students could use the program Flipgrid to create tutorials on topics of interest and refine them based on peer feedback.
Gamification Students can earn rewards and unlock new levels of content using a program like Canvas to simulate a game-based learning experience.

Sample Lesson

Grade Level: 10th Grade
Subject: World History 1500 – Present – The Industrial Revolution
Lesson Objectives:
To analyze and evaluate historical primary sources using rhetorical context to determine motivation and meaning.
To describe the conditions faced by workers during the Industrial Revolution.
Lesson Essential Questions:
How can rhetorical context help finding mean in primary sources?
Were textile factories bad for the health of English workers?
What recommendations would you give to British parliament to solve the declining health of English workers?
Competency: To identify the authors purpose and bias to evaluate historical primary sources.
To advocate for improvement of a social cause.
Materials: Document A; Document B; Document C; Document D; Chromebook (other devices would be acceptable for access to the online tool Flipgrid through browser or app)
Instruction/Procedure/Activities: 
The teacher role in this activity will be as a facilitator, students will be given the following scenario on a Google Doc on their Chromebooks. 

You are a member of the House of Lords given the task of investigating rumors that workers in nearby factors are being mistreated. Your job is to find out if factories are creating unsafe work conditions for workers. If these rumors are true, the factory owners must be brought to justice and stand trial for their crimes. You must work in the shadows with a partner to compile the evidence needed to make a case (Make a copy of each document, you will attach them later to Google Classroom). You send a doctor to investigate a nearby factory and the doctor returns with a report. Review the report to see his findings. You realize that one eye witness isn’t enough to make your case, so you send another doctor to observe. The doctor soon reports back. You realize that you must go see the factory yourself but do not want to get caught. You have your partner pose as a worker so they can go into the factory and steal any documents they can find. They return in the afternoon holding a journal. While browsing the parliament library you find a book written about factories. You find an interesting selection.

Complete your research on the following document: Number each paragraph of the document. When was the document written? Who was the author of the document? Do we know anything about them? Annotate (Highlighting, margin notes, bolding vocabulary, etc..) the text as your read. When you finish reading through each of the documents and annotating them to find evidence supporting one of the statements:

Factories are creating unsafe work conditions.

Or

Factories are not creating unsafe work conditions.

Write a speech using the “Factory Research Document” that provides an objective overview of your findings and expresses your personal opinions on those findings. Make a recommendation to parliament about any action you would want to take regarding to those findings. You may choose to record your speech (using Flipgrid) or perform it live in front of parliament (classmates).
Assessment Activity: Write a speech using the “Factory Research Document” that provides an objective overview of your findings and expresses your personal opinions on those findings. Ensure that you respond to the three questions below. You may choose to record your speech (using Flipgrid) or perform it live in front of parliament (classmates).

Question 1: What was the author's purpose and bias?
Question 2: How did you determine the author's purpose and bias?Question 3: What recommendations would you give to British parliament to solve the declining health of English workers?

Follow Up: Students will watch three of their peers videos and respond using the “Two Votes and a “What if?” feedback. Students will revise their video based on the peer feedback.