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Introduction Speeches

Introduction Speeches

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Author: Anthony Cobb
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Tutorial

Self Introduction Speech Outline Formula

Self Introduction Speech

Outline Formula

 

###b/b###

 and the lesson you learned

Introduction:

Grabber: A statement that grabs the audience’s attention.

Preview: The main points of the speech

Body:

I.  Tell a story or event

          A. Give details

          B. Give details so we can see the story unfold

          C.  Draw us into your story

Transition: a statement that connects your story to the life lesson

II. This event changed me (the way I think, what I do, how I act, what I believe) in many ways

          A. In the future I will….  I will act differently

          B. I will treat others differently

Conclusion:

Review: Review the story and the lesson briefly

Closure: Give a “life lesson” that can apply to others.

Make the last sentence have a real impact

 

 

Organizing the Preparation Outline for your Introduction Speech

                Organizing the Preparation Outline for your Introduction Speech

I.                  Start with Main Points

A.                Look at the information that you gathered and try to find a way to organize your main points (chronological, spatial, topical, problem-solution, cause-effect).  For example if you want to tell your audience about your partners background, education, and hobbies you would organize them in that order – first main point = background, second main point = education, and the third main point would be hobbies.  It would only make sense to tell us the person’s background first. 

B.                You should have at least two and no more than three main points for your short introduction speech.

C.               State the main points in full sentences (not in fragments).  Also, devote an appropriate amount of time to each one.

II.                 Next, Make Components of the Main Points with Sub-points

A.                Look at the information you gathered that fits under each main point and come up with key ideas that belong to these main points.  These will be your sub-points.   You need at least two sub-points for each main point. 

B.            Sub-points can be in complete sentences or fragments.

III.               Support Your Sub-points with Sub-Sub-points (your facts and examples)

A.            You don’t necessarily need sub-sub-points for your short introduction speech, however, most of you will have sub-sub-points in your speech, because these are the facts and information that support what you are saying.  You could include a quote from your partner.

B.            Sub-sub-points you use for supporting your sub-points--can be personal experiences your interviewee has shared with you.

IV.           Use Connectives Throughout Your Speech (refer to the connectives handout in your handout packet)

A.                Know what transitions and signposts are, and when to use them.

B.                Label and include all connectives in your preparation outline.

The Following is a Template and Guidelines FOR AN INTRODUCTION SPEECH PREPARATION OUTLINE:  MAKE CERTAIN THAT YOU LABEL EVERYTHING! (All labels are in parentheses--include all labels and visual framework in your outline.  You may have 2 OR 3 main points.).   You can use the following template for your Preparation outline by typing your information into the template and replacing the explanations.  This is just an example/template.  You may have only two main points, and two sub-points for each main point.  You may not have any sub-sub-points, sub-sub-sub-points.  In your introduction and conclusion you will include the same number of elements.  In the introduction the Attention getter is always first and the Preview is last.  The order of the other elements is up to you.  You will include your title Specific Purpose, and Central Idea in the spaces provided.  Your outline will start after the following line of asterisks.  Delete this entire explanation ABOVE.

         ************************************************************************************************************************************************************ 

Specific Purpose:  This is what your main points must support or prove.  Tell me in one               sentence what the purpose of your speech is–for example I will introduce Jack [interviewee’s name will be Jack for this example] to my audience.

Central Idea:          Summarize your speech/outline in one sentence.  Should clearly sum up all of your main points.  A declarative sentence. 

                                                  For example: Jack has overcome many difficulties in his pursuit of a degree in Education, yet still has time to enjoy life.

INTRODUCTION

I.        (Attention Getter)  This could be a story or anything you know will GRAB your                    audience's attention.   “Albert Einstein once said that in the middle of difficulties lie opportunities.  We all experience difficulties in our lives, however, what makes some of us different from others is how we deal with the difficulties.  The person I will introduce to you today sees difficulties as opportunities.”

II.       (Reveal Topic) Reveal your topic to your audience–just your topic–not a preview.

“Today I have the opportunity to introduce you to Jack Hart, our new classmate.”

III.      (Credibility Statement)  Answer the question "Why should we listen to YOU?"  Give some type of factual information or some reference that will show that you know what you are talking about.  This could be the fact that you had an extensive in-class interview with your interviewee.  Perhaps you did additional research, or you telephoned your interviewee. 

“I interviewed Jack in class, and spoke with him on the phone.  Before the interview I didn’t Know Jack—now I do.”

IV.      (Preview)  Briefly reveal your topic and state what your main points will be.

For example:  “Today, I will tell you about Jack’s

A.              Main point 1 goes here “background”

B.              Main point 2 goes here “education”

C.              Main point 3 goes here “and his hobbies

(TRANSITION:  Transitions are used to go smoothly from one part/point of the speech to another. Include in all of your connectives the exact wording you will use in your speech.  “Let us start with Jack’s background.”)

 

BODY

I.        (MAIN POINT 1)  Your first main point goes here-it MUST be one complete sentence.

For example: “Jack has overcome many difficulties in his life.”

A.       (SUBPOINT)  You MUST have at least two subpoints under each main point.      This could be one complete sentence or a phrase of fragment.  

“When Jack was nine years old he lost his father to cancer.”

 

1.       (SUB-SUBPOINT)  This is where the specific examples from your research are included to support your main points.  You can use quotes, examples, stories, facts, statistics, analogies, etc…. Be sure to cite all sources. 

“Jack quickly became the ‘Man’ of the house.”

a.       (Sub-sub-subpoint) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.  You can use abbreviations for the label--Example = (SSSP).

“Having two younger brothers to care for gave Jack a great deal of responsibility at an early age.”

 

b.       (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you must have a ‘b.’

“Every chance he could he helped his Mother around the house.”

 

2.       (SSP)  More of the above. If you have a ‘1.’ you must have a ‘2.’

                    B.       (SP) You Must have a ‘B.’  You must include at least 2 subpoints for each Main Point

1.       (SSP) Sub-Sub-Points and SSSPs are optional, however, you will most likely have both in your speech to support your subpoints and main points.

a.       (SSSP) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.

b.       (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you  need a ‘b.’

                                        2.       (SSP)

                    C.       (SUBPOINT--optional)

1.       (SSP)

2.       (SSP)

TRANSITION: A transition is used to go smoothly from the 1st Main Point to the 2nd Main Point.

(Include the exact wording of your transition)  For example: “Now you know a little bit about Jack’s background let me tell you about his educational.”

II.       (MP 2) Your second MAIN POINT goes here.  Follow the same format that you used for the first main point.  “Jack has some specific educational goals.”

A.       (SUBPOINT)  You should have at least two subpoints under each main point.      This could be one complete sentence.  You cannot have an A without a B.

1.       (SUB-SUBPOINT)  This is where the specific examples from your research are included to support your main points.  You can use quotes, examples, stories. Be sure to cite all sources.  If you have a ‘1.’ you must have a ‘2..’

a.       (Sub-sub-subpoint) Further examples and information to support your subpoint. 

b.       (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you  need a ‘b.’

2.       (SSP)  More of the above.

                    B.       (SP)

1.       (SSP)

a.       (SSSP) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.

b.       (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you  need a ‘b.’

                                        2.       (SSP)

                    C.       (SUBPOINT--optional)

1.       (SSP)

2.       (SSP)

TRANSITION: A transition is used to go smoothly from the 2nd Main Point to the 3rd Main Point.

                       (Include the exact wording of your transition)

III.      (MP 3) Your third MAIN POINT goes here. (The total number of main points is optional, however, three main points seems to be the number easiest to manage as a speaker, and the easiest to remember for your audience.)   “Jack enjoys life every chance he gets.”

A.       (SUBPOINT)  You should have at least two subpoints under each main point.      This could be one complete sentence.  You cannot have an A without a B.

1.       (SUB-SUBPOINT)  This is where the specific examples from your research are included to support your main points.  You can use quotes, examples, stories. Be sure to cite all sources.  If you have a ‘1.’ you must have a ‘2..’

a.       (Sub-sub-subpoint) Further examples and information to support your subpoint. 

b.       (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you  need a ‘b.’

2.       (SSP)  More of the above.

                    B.       (SP)

1.       (SSP)

a.       (SSSP) Further examples and information to support your subpoint.

b.       (SSSP) If you have an ‘a.’ you  need a ‘b.’

                                        2.       (SSP)

                    C.       (SUBPOINT--optional)

1.       (SSP)

2.       (SSP)

TRANSITION:         A Transition is used to transition smoothly from the body of your speech into the conclusion. (Include in your transitional statement your exact wording)

                                                  “We can see that Jack enjoys life – let us review what makes Jack who he is today.”

CONCLUSION

I.        (Summary Statement)  Summarize your main points.  Be specific and concise.  Give an example from each main point.  “Jack has overcome many losses and difficulties in his life.  He has helped raise his two younger brothers.  While helping raise his siblings he decided that he would like to pursue a career as a Teacher.  Jack is not all work and no play—Jack enjoys surfing and he loves working with children.  Jack has combined his two passions by teaching surfing to children in the Maui Youth Program.”

II.       (Memorable Closing Statement)  Leave your audience with something to think about.  A memorable close that refers back to the attention getter creates psychological unity for your audience.   “At one time or another you may have thought to yourself that You Don’t Know Jack, however, now you do.  Jack has found nothing but opportunities in the difficulties he has faced – I encourage you to take the opportunity to get to know Jack—it won’t be difficult.   Let’s welcome him to our class.”