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Learning 3-D Shapes

Learning 3-D Shapes

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Author: Elizabeth Murdock
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Students learn about 3-D shaped in our first grade.

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Tutorial

Common Core Objective: Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.

We have learned a lot about 2-D shapes. Some common ones we talk about are squares, rectangles, circles, and triangles. 

Go through this google slides for homework and before proceeding with the lesson

Watch this video for some extra help.

3-D shapes are shapes with volume, or space. 

The ones we are leaning about in this lesson are cubes, pyramids, and cylinders.

Cubes have 6 faces that are all made of squares. 

Some boxes are shaped like cubes. 

Dice are shaped like cubes.

Pyramids have 1 square base, and 4 triangles on the side. 

The ancient Egyptian pyramids are pyramids.

Cylinders have two circular sides and one rectangle to close them. 

Toilet paper rolls are shaped like cylinders.

Paper towel rolls are shaped like cylinders. 

Pipes are shaped like cylinders. 

Try these games out to reassure your knowledge.

Once you have completed the quiz, write down three new things you have learned from this lesson. Turn it into the homework box on January 20, 2020.