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Lymphatic System

Lymphatic System

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This lesson will identify the major structures and will discuss the function of the lymphatic system.

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Tutorial

What's Covered

This lesson will be identifying the function of the lymphatic system as it relates to:

  1. The Circulatory System
  2. The Immune System

1. The Circulatory System

The lymphatic system returns fluid from tissues in the body to the circulatory system.

Example When fluids leak out of capillaries and are exchanged with tissues, some of those fluids at some point need to be returned back to the circulatory system; the lymphatic system is the system that does just that.

Term to Know

    • Lymphatic System
    • A system of vessels, nodes, glands, and lymph nodules that serves two major bodily functions: completing the fluid cycle by returning excess tissue fluid into the blood and producing, maturing and storing cells of the immune system.

The lymph vascular system is that system of capillaries and vessels that helps to collect those fluids and then transports them back to ducts of the cardiovascular system. Lymph is the tissue fluid that has been moved into lymph vessels, and lymph vessels carry lymph throughout the lymphatic system.

Terms to Know

    • Lymph
    • A clear colorless fluid similar to plasma that circulates throughout lymphatic vessels on its way to the blood stream; lymph contains far less protein than plasma.
    • Lymph Vascular System
    • A system of lymphatic vessels that are used to circulate lymph back into the blood stream; lymphatic vessels circulate lymph through lymph nodes to be filtered before entering the blood stream.

2. The Immune System

the lymphatic system also works with the body’s immune system. Different structures within the lymphatic system help play a role in the body's defense.

  • Lymph nodes are scattered and located all throughout our body, and they filter lymph. Lymph nodes are filled with white blood cells. This gives the white blood cells a chance to take care of any disease-causing agents before the fluid enters back into the circulatory system.
  • The thymus gland is where T lymphocytes, a type of white blood cells that plays a role in immunity, mature, multiply, and become specialized.
  • The spleen is another organ of our lymphatic system that has various important roles. It is a major production site for antibodies and also:
    • helps dispose of old red blood cells
    • filters our blood.
    • also stores lymphocytes.
  • Bone marrow is an important part of the lymphatic system it is where white blood cells are produced.
  • Tonsils (not included in diagram) are actually a part of the lymphatic system, too, where bacteria can be filtered before it moves back into your system.

Terms to Know

    • Lymph Node
    • A bean-shaped organ of the lymphatic system that ranges in size from microscopic to the size of a kidney bean. Lymph nodes contain dense populations of white blood cells, especially lymphocytes, and filter lymph as if flows through the node.
    • Spleen
    • The largest lymphatic organ that acts like a lymph node by filtering blood as it flows through it. The spleen is located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen. The spleen internally contains white and red pulp and is often called a blood reservoir.
    • Thymus
    • A gland located in the mediastinum (cavity between the lungs) just above the heart that matures T cells, not produces them.

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Summary

The lymphatic system works with two different systems of the body. For the circulatory system, the lymphatic system gathers fluids from tissues in the body and returns it to the circulatory system. Different structures in the lymphatic system play an important role in the immune system. Lymph nodes contain a large number of white blood cells and filter lymph before it is returned to the circulatory system. The thymus gland is where t lymphocytes mature and become specialized, the spleen creates antibodies, filters blood, and stores lymphocytes. Bone marrow produces white blood cells. This is how the lymphatic system works with both the circulatory system and immune system.

Keep up the learning and have a great day!

Source: Source: THIS WORK IS ADAPTED FROM SOPHIA AUTHOR AMANDA SODERLIND

TERMS TO KNOW
  • Lymphatic System

    A system of vessels, nodes, glands, and lymph nodules that serves two major bodily functions: completing the fluid cycle by returning excess tissue fluid into the blood and producing, maturing and storing cells of the immune system.

  • Lymph

    A clear colorless fluid similar to plasma that circulates throughout lymphatic vessels on its way to the blood stream; lymph contains far less protein than plasma.

  • Lymph Vascular System

    A system of lymphatic vessels that are used to circulate lymph back into the blood stream; lymphatic vessels circulate lymph through lymph nodes to be filtered before entering the blood stream.

  • Lymph Node

    A bean-shaped organ of the lymphatic system that ranges in size from microscopic to the size of a kidney bean. Lymph nodes contain dense populations of white blood cells, especially lymphoctyes, and filter lymph as if flows through the node.

  • Spleen

    The largest lymphatic organ that acts like a lymph node by filtering blood as it flows through it. The spleen is located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen. The spleen internally contains white and red pulp and is often called a blood reservoir.

  • Thymus

    A gland located in the mediastinum (cavity between the lungs) just above the heart that matures T cells, not produces them.