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Mechanical Waves and the Math of Waves

Mechanical Waves and the Math of Waves

Description:

Students will learn about mechanical waves, mediums, longitudinal waves, parts of a wave, and how to calculate waves.

This is your notes for Concepts 1 and 2 on your Student Unit Planner.

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Tutorial

Mechanical Waves, its' parts, and the Math of Waves

This video covers 2 major concepts and 2 different days of "WSQ"ing. :)

Source: Langhans and various other educators

These are the “S” in WSQ. You must have them under your video notes completed by the due date on the Unit Plan.

Part 1: Mechanical Waves and Its Parts

1. What does a wave carry/

2. Describe a medium.

3. What are the crowded parts of the wave called?

4. How do you measure wavelength?

 

Part 2: Math of Waves

Use the following picture to answer the questions below:

1. How many full wavelengths are there in the picture?

2. Calculate its' frequency. Assume 1 sec.

3. What would the frequency of the wave be if this wave came out in 2 secs?

 

Use the following picture to answer the questions below:

4. How many full wavelengths are there in the picture?

5. If this picture was taken over one second, what is its' frequency?

Source: various educators and Langhans; Barnett Dreyfuss

HOT Question: Sound

After you have watched the video and answered the summarizing questions, write a HOT question. See the directions above and on your Unit Planner.

Source: inspired by C. Kirch