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Reflection: The Significance of Policies on the Classroom Expectations

Reflection: The Significance of Policies on the Classroom Expectations

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Guide learners in ways to reflect on the limitations and benefits of acceptable use and responsible use policies as they relate to their classrooms

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Source: Globe, Clker, http://bit.ly/1CVSonk; Stick Figure, Clker, http://bit.ly/1JoIB83; Children, Pixabay, http://bit.ly/17stY7s; Blue High Five, Pixabay, http://bit.ly/1MNTG78

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Hello everyone, and welcome. In this lesson, we will reflect on some of the limitations that come with acceptable use policies as compared to responsible use policies. We'll also be using Robert Marzano's framework to guide us, so let's get started. Let's begin by reviewing the two policies.

Although the aim of both is to protect students and to provide them with access to the internet, there are major differences between acceptable use and responsible use policies. An acceptable use policy includes a set of rules that are applied by networks and website owners that may limit the way in which the network or website is used.

A responsible use policy includes a set of rules that are applied by networks and website owners that outline the way in which the network or website is used. Just one word different, but it means a lot. Acceptable use policies at schools describe what students are not allowed to do. Whereas responsible use policies at school describe what students are allowed to do.

These differences have major implications when it comes to establishing classroom routines and lesson objectives. As you reflect, you will want to ask yourself how the policy you have in place helps or hinders your teaching. For example, a responsible use policy allow students to freely access resources from YouTube and communicate with Twitter, whereas some acceptable use policies place restrictions on those sites.

However, an advantage that comes with the limitations of an acceptable use policy is that there's less of a chance of receiving spam, junk mail, or even computer viruses.

Let's review the work of Robert Marzano and his framework for teaching. His first domain is called classroom strategies and behaviors. It contains 41 elements organized into nine design questions.

In this video, we will focus on design question number seven. What will I do to recognize and acknowledge adherence to rules and procedures? And the following elements, demonstrating with-it-ness, and applying consequences for lack of adherence to rules and procedures, and acknowledging adherence to rules and procedures.

In this lesson, we will use these elements as part of our reflection. The teachers awareness of what's going on with all learners at any given moment in the lesson is called with-it-ness. It doesn't matter if you're teaching in the 21st century or in the 19th century, having your finger on the pulse of learners that you are responsible for will make you more effective.

From kindergarten to college, it is the instructor's responsibility to get to know the learners style, strengths, and needs. Being aware of what and how they're doing will make a considerable difference. Applying consequences for lack of adherence to rules and procedures. Our students will make mistakes, they will make poor decisions, and they will do things that are just flat out wrong.

However, as teachers it is our responsibility to help them make amends and learn from their errors. A major movement toward restorative justice in schools is happening today. This is where students learn that they are an important part of a community, and that their actions have natural consequences that impact everyone. This feature makes it easy to translate into a digital community as well.

You will have to think about what practices best suits your situation. Finally, ask yourself if you are doing enough to acknowledge the good things that your students doing. I have seen many teachers spend a great deal of time, effort, and money on reward systems and token economies only to realize that there are times that a smile and a high five is all the student really needed or wanted.

Let's summarize what was in today's lesson. We reviewed the differences between acceptable use and responsible use policies. We looked at Marzano's framework, specifically domain 1, and then we looked closely at design question number seven.

And here's today's food for thought. Make a list of all the great things your students are doing and share it with them. Students of any age will appreciate your thoughts.

Now it's your turn to apply what you've learned in this video. The additional resources section will be extremely helpful. This section is designed to help you discover useful ways to apply what you've learned here. Each link includes a brief description, so you can easily target the resources you want. As always, thanks so much for watching. We'll see you next time.

Notes on "Reflection: The Significance of Policies on the Classroom Expectations"

(00:00-00:15) Intro

(00:16-01:35) Use Policies

(01:36-02:14) Marzano’s Framework

(02:15-03:44) Design Question 7

(03:45-04:03) Summary

(04:04-04:34) Food For Thought

Additional Resources

Carnegie Mellon - The Syllabus: Course Policies / Expectations

This site stresses the importance of setting expectations when using online or blended learning. There are useful links to policies that will help you craft your own classroom policies and expectations.
http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/design/syllabus/samples-policiesexpectations/


How to Break Down Rules, Procedures and Expectations

This resource is a useful tool that supports teachers in building classroom expectations and procedures that are aligned to the school and district expectations. This is a practical guide that teachers can employ in their own practice.
http://www.roseburg.k12.or.us/depts/ss/pbs/documents/Rules_000.pdf