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Rhythm

Rhythm

Description:

In this lesson, you will learn about the Rhythm principle.

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Tutorial

What's Covered

Welcome to today's lesson on rhythm. This lesson will cover the rhythm principle, why it's important, and a few examples of rhythm in practice. Specifically, this lesson will cover:

  1. Defining Rhythm
  2. Rhythm and Lines
  3. Examples of Rhythm

1. Defining Rhythm

Rhythm is a visual principle that emulates time by repeating strong and weak elements sequentially in a design.

Term to Know

  • Rhythm
  • Rhythm is a visual principle that emulates time by repeating strong and weak elements sequentially in a design.

So you'll have repeating elements in a design that will emulate progression or movement in some fashion.

Below is an image of some very simple shapes in a very simple pattern that create rhythm.

So there is a repeating visual element that creates a regular beat. So rhythm in music will have that beat and, similarly, in design it'll have this sort of flow or beat as well.

Take a look at the Morse code wine label below.

Morse code was this means of transmitting text back in the day, using basic tones, clicks, or sounds. You'll notice the repeating elements, again very similar in shape to our first example. However, there's no longer that sense of movement anymore here. There's no real beat. There's no real rhythm. So much is just shapes that the common viewer will see as just stacked or scattered. There's not that nice pattern or flow that we had from our first example.


2. Rhythm and Lines

Rhythm can also be applied to line work.

It can be used to create an area that will navigate the viewer's eye through the design, like in the example above of this spiral that's commonly known as the Fibonacci sequence or golden rectangle. Here rhythm is used effectively to spiral the viewer inward into the design. So the line here creates this nice flow or movement.


3. Examples of Rhythm

You might see examples of line work in your garden.

Or maybe you're just bored and looking at the ceiling indoors.

Or maybe you're just sitting around and waiting to catch the next train.

So there's a lot of repeating elements here as well, and even that nice line that will guide the viewer all the way to the end of the tunnel.


Summary

That concludes today’s lesson on defining rhythm, investigating the relationship between rhythm and lines, and looking at some examples of rhythm.

Keep up the learning and have a great day!

Source: THIS WORK IS ADAPTED FROM SOPHIA AUTHOR MARIO E. HERNANDEZ​

TERMS TO KNOW
  • Rhythm

    Rhythm is a visual principle that emulates time by repeating strong and weak elements sequentially in a design.