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Week 10: Data Collection Methods
Once you have a purpose, a question, and a design in mind, you will be in a good position to determine the best methods for obtaining a sample and collecting data. 
Some of the various sampling and data collection methods, as covered in this week’s readings, can be used across different research designs—quantitative, qualitative, or mixed. Again, as in previous weeks, the important consideration is to ensure that there is alignment among the various components of a research study, including its purpose, research questions, design, sample, and methods. 
As you consider sampling strategies and methods for collecting data, you might visit Walden University’s Participant Pool to view the descriptions of research studies currently available for participation. You will likely notice a variety of sampling methods reflected in participant eligibility criteria and various data collection methods being used by student and faculty researchers in the Walden community.
This week, you will evaluate the strengths and limitations of sampling methods and data collection methods, and you will consider their ethical implications. You will also develop an annotated bibliography of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research articles.
Learning Objectives 
Students will:
Defend sampling methods
Explain strengths and limitations of data collection methods
Apply strategies for addressing ethical issues in data collection
Develop an annotated bibliography
Apply APA Style to writing

Required Resources 
Note: To access this week's required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Journal Article: Teddlie, C., & Yu, F. (2007). Mixed methods sampling: A typology with examples. Journal of Mixed Methods Research, 1(1), 77–100. doi: 10.1177/2345678906292430 Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Journal Article: Onwuegbuzie, A. J., & Collins, K. M. (2007). A typology of mixed methods sampling designs in social science research. The Qualitative Report, 12(2), 281–316. Retrieved from http://nsuworks.nova.edu/tqr/vol12/iss2/9
Journal Article: Drost, E. A. (2011). Validity and reliability in social science research. Education Research and Perspectives, 38(1), 105–124. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases. 
Website: Walden University: Center for Research Quality. (2015a). Data resources & support: Home. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/researchcenter/dataresourcesDownload the “Sources of Data for Research: A Research Primer” document.
Website: Walden University: Center for Research Quality. (2015d). Research resources: Walden University participant pool. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/researchcenter/resources/participantpool
Website: Walden University. (2015a). How do I find an article that reports on research that uses a specific methodology? Retrieved from http://academicanswers.waldenu.edu/faq/72633 
Website: Walden University: Writing Center. (2015). Common course assignments: Annotated bibliographies. Retrieved from http://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/assignments/annotatedbibliographies
Price, S. (2015). Annotated bibliographies [Online webinar]. Retrieved from https://waldencss.adobeconnect.com/p7d6uqxv8g3?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal

Week 10 Discussion
Sampling and Collecting Quantitative and Qualitative Data
It is often not possible or practical to study an entire population, so researchers draw samples from which they make inferences about a population of interest. In quantitative research, where generalization to a population is typically valued, a researcher’s ability to make such inferences is only as good as the sampling method she or he uses to obtain the sample. Although generalization is typically not a goal in qualitative research, sampling is no less important. Indeed, for quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research, sampling is a critical aspect of the research process. 

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