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Shakespeare's Macbeth & the Wyrd Sisters

Shakespeare's Macbeth & the Wyrd Sisters

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Author: Mark Trevena
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Grades 9-10.

CCSS, RI: Key Ideas and Details, 9-10.3 (English)

"Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them."

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Tutorial

Common Core State Standards

RI: Key Ideas and Details, 9-10.3 (English)

"Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them."

Establishing the Scene

View the first scene with the Wyrd Sisters from Shakespeare's Macbeth, directed by Jack Gold (1983), here. Compare the director's interpretation of Act 1, scene 1 with how you imagined it, and discuss the various effects on mood, plot, foreshadowing, etc. with a partner. Why is it important to set the mood in a scene? Does the aforementioned scene do this well? This can be used to help spur thoughts, but do not simply parrot what has been said.

Why Are the Wyrd Sisters Important?

What are your initial impressions of the Wyrd Sisters? How do they accentuate Macbeth's flaws even in Act 1, scene 1?

Additional resources here.

Big Question (for Group Discussion)

If the Wyrd Sisters are so powerful that they seemingly bend the fates to their will, why do they need to tell Macbeth about his prophecy to set the play's events in motion? Why do they not simply rule over everything with their power?