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Shape

Shape

Description:

In this lesson, you will learn about the Shape element and how it is used in the visual design process.

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Tutorial

Source: Image of Bedroom, Creative Commons http://www.flickr.com/photos/jinkazamah/2717771604/ Image of Rectilinear, Public Domain http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Rectilinear_polygons.svg

Video Transcription

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Hi, everyone. My name is Mario. And I'd like to welcome you to today's lesson on shape. So we'll learn about the shape element and its use in the visual design process today in this lesson. So as always, feel free to go at your own pace and pause, fast forward, and rewind as you see fit. And when you're ready to go, then let's get started.

So let's define shape first. A shape is a two-dimensional plane with the clear, identifiable boundary. So unlike form, shape is two dimensional.

So for example, a plane. And your plane is an area within a two-dimensional surface that extends to a specific direction or position. And the plane is a particular kind of shape.

So again, a plane is, like I said, a particular kind of shape, but it's the area between the surface, a two-dimensional surface. So a plane can be parallel or skewed, and recede into space. So ceilings, walls, and floors, windows are a good example of physical planes, as you see here. Man, I wish my room looked like that.

Now, shape's a variant. It brings us to another key word, which is shape variation, which relates to the diverse range of contours that can be implemented on the boundary of a shape, such as angular, curvy, and straight.

So let's take a rectilinear shape. A rectilinear shape is a shape that is characterized by straight line. So here's an example of just what that looks like. So it's very obvious and very clear straight lines.

And then we also have curvilinear, which is the shape that is characterized by curvy lines for boundaries. So here's some examples of that as well. So very obvious curved elements.

And that actually wraps up today's lesson on shape. Pretty simple, huh? So we'll end with our key terms, as usual. So shape, two-dimensional plane, shape variation, rectilinear, and curvilinear.

So I hope you've enjoyed this lesson today with me. My name is Mario. And I'll see you next lesson.

TERMS TO KNOW
  • Shape

    A shape is a two-dimensional plane with a clear, identifiable boundary.

  • Two-Dimensional

    Two-Dimensional is defined by something with two coordinates: width and height.

  • Plane

    Plane is an area within a two-dimensional surface that extends to a specific direction or position. A plane is a particular kind of shape.

  • Shape Variation

    Shape Variation relates to the diverse range of contours that can be implemented on the boundary of a shape such as angular, curvy, straight.

  • Rectilinear

    A shape that is characterized by straight lines.

  • Curvilinear

    A shape that is characterized by curvy lines for boundaries.