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Simultaneous Discrimination Training

Simultaneous Discrimination Training

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Author: Capella Partnered with CARD
Description:

This lesson covers:
BCAT C-1: Discrimination training
RBT C-7: Implement discrimination training.

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Tutorial

what's covered
This lesson will explore simultaneous discrimination training by defining and discussing the following:
  1. Simultaneous Discrimination Training Overview
  2. Seven Steps for “No Known” Targets
  3. Four Steps for “Known” Targets

1. Simultaneous Discrimination Training Overview

In plain English, a simultaneous discrimination requires a person to tell the difference between two or more stimuli that are present at the same time.

hint
An easy way to think of this is that simultaneous discriminations are like multiple choice tests.

EXAMPLE

When asked, “Where’s the cup?” in the presence of a cup and a fork, the patient responds by pointing to the cup and not the fork.

In simultaneous discrimination training, a field of stimuli is presented with the instruction. In simultaneous discrimination training, SD examples would include “Touch,” “Put with same,” “Give me,” and “Point to.”

Touch Red

In this training, we list seven steps in situations with “no known” targets and four steps in those with “known” targets. The next two sections will break each of these down and explain how and when to use them.

term to know

Simultaneous Discrimination Training
A field of stimuli is presented with the instruction

2. Seven Steps for “No Known” Targets

Seven steps are used when there are “no known” targets. What does this mean? It means that the patient does not have any mastered skills or targets within this skill set. The seven steps process is only used when introducing programs that have no mastered, or known, targets.

hint
Some patients do not need to move through all seven steps. Your BCBA will provide individual guidance.

At this time, we are going to introduce two targets at the same time (we will tell you why in the end).

step by step

Step Description Example
1 MT Target 1 Alone
First, we are going to introduce the first target in simultaneous discrimination training. In our example, Target 1 will be red.

This will always be the first step in every discrimination training. We mass trial alone first to teach the patient what the target is.
Step 1: Touch Red
2 MT Target 1 vs. Unknown Distracters
Blue is an unknown distracter because it has not been learned.

We then use unknown distracters rather than known distracters to ensure that we are teaching proper discrimination. If we were to use known distracters, they would just be guessing what the right answer would be.
Step 2: Touch Red (with blue distractor)
3 MT Target 2 Alone
Now, we have done all we can with Target 1 Red. It is time to introduce our second Target. In this case, Target 2 will be Green.

Again, we MT alone first to teach the patient what the target is.
Step 3: Touch Green
4 MT Target 2 vs. Unknown Distracters
Yellow is an unknown distracter because it has not been learned.

Again, we use an unknown distracter rather than a known distracter to ensure we are teaching proper discrimination.
Step 4: Touch Green (with yellow distractor)
5 MT Target 1 with Target 2 as a Distracter
Next, we are bringing back Target 1 and using Target 2 as a “known distracter.”

We are only asking about T1: Red, not T2: Green.
Step 5: Touch Red (with green distractor)
6 MT Target 2 with Target 1 as a Distracter
We are only asking about T2: Green, not T1: Red.
Step 6: Touch Green (with red distractor)
7 RR Target 1 vs. Target 2
Now we ask about both in random order.

This will always be the last step in every discrimination training.
Step 7 Trial 1 - Touch Green (with red distractor) in random order, Trial 2 - Touch Red (with green distractor) in random order, Trial 3 - Touch Red (with green distractor) in random order


big idea
Once both targets have met mastery criteria of two times at 80% or better in random rotation with a first trial correct response, they are considered “mastered” or “learned.”

Video Transcription

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[MUSIC] Touch the word computer. Nice job sweetie. Good for you. OK. Touch the word computer. Nice job. Touch the word computer. [GASPS] Nice going. So, so smart. OK. Ready? Touch the word computer. Awesome. Way to go cutie.

[MUSIC]

Touch the word computer. Nice job. You did it. Touch the word computer. Super. OK. Touch the word computer. Oh, my god. You did it. Way to go girl.

Thank you.

OK. Touch the word computer. [GASPS] Nice job.

Thank you.

OK. Touch the word computer. Super job. All right. Touch the word computer. Nice going babe. Way to go.

[MUSIC]

OK. We're going to learn a new word. Ready?

Mhm.

OK. Touch the word yogurt. Nice job. That's yogurt. OK. Touch the word yogurt. Super. Touch the word yogurt. Oh, you got it. Way to go.

[MUSIC]

Here we go. Touch the word yogurt. That's right. Good for you. OK. Touch the word yogurt. [GASPS] Yes. You did it. Good job. That says yogurt. Nice job sweetie. Touch the word yogurt. Awesome. Way to go. You're so smart.

Thank you.

You're really good at this. OK. Here we go. Touch the word yogurt. Oh, you found it. Way to go. Good job sweetie.

[MUSIC]

Point to the word computer. Nice job. You did it.

Thank you.

OK. Touch the word computer. Nice job sweetie.

Thank you.

OK. Touch the word computer. Oh, nice job. I tried to trick you. Good for you. OK. Touch the word computer. Super. Way to go.

[MUSIC]

OK. Get ready.

OK.

All right. Touch the word yogurt. Nice job. Yogurt. OK. Touch the word yogurt. Super. You did it. OK. Touch the word yogurt.

This one.

Nice job. That says yogurt. Good for you sweetie. Touch the word yogurt.

This one.

Nice job. Way to go smarty pants. Good for you.

[MUSIC]

Ready?

Mhm.

OK. Touch the word computer. Awesome. You did it. Good job. OK. Touch the word computer. Wow. That's right. Good for you sweetie.

Touch the word yogurt.

Hmm. This one.

Nice going. It says yogurt. I love it. You're doing so good. Thank you.

OK. Touch the word computer. Wow. Sweet. Good for you.

OK. Here we go. Touch the word yogurt. Wow. I love it. You did such a good job.

Thank you.

You ready for a break?

Mm-hmm.

OK, good.

[MUSIC]

Here is a summary of the seven steps:

Simultaneous Discrimination Training
First two targets:
1. MT Target 1 in isolation, 2 x 80%
2. MT Target 1 versus distractor items, 2 x 80%
3. MT Target 2 in isolation, 2 x 80%
4. MT Target 2 versus distractor items, 2 x 80%
5. MT Target 1 versus Target 2 distractor, 2 x 80%
6. MT Target 2 versus Target 1 distractor, 2 x 80%
7. RR Target 1 and Target 2, 2 x 80%

Now that we have two mastered targets, we can move to the four steps.


3. Four Steps for “Known” Targets

The four steps process is used when there are “known” targets. This means that the patient has some mastered targets within this skill set. It is used to teach all remaining targets in the program.

At this time, we are going to introduce one target. For this example, Target 3 is Blue.

step by step

Step Description Example
1 MT Target 3 Alone
Remember, Target 3 is Blue.

We mass trial alone first to teach the patient what the target is.
Step 1: Touch Blue
2 MT Target 3 vs. Unknown Distracters
Yellow is an unknown distracter because it has not been learned.

We then use unknown distracters rather than known distracters to ensure that we are teaching proper discrimination. If we were to use known distracters, they would just be guessing what the right answer would be.
Step 2: Touch Blue (with yellow distractor)
3 MT Target 3 vs. Known Distracters
This is when we bring back Red and Green for Trial 1, 2, and 3.
Step 3: Touch Blue (with red and green distractors)
4 RR Target 3 vs. Previously Mastered Targets
Now we ask about all in random order, but we should focus on Blue to ensure we meet mastery criteria.

Once Target 3 meets mastery criteria of two times at 80% or better in random rotation with a first trial correct response, it is considered “mastered” or “learned.”
Step 4: Trial 1 - Touch Blue (with green distractor), Trial 2 - Touch Red (with blue distractor), Trial 3- Touch Blue (with red distractor)

Here is a summary of the four steps:

Simultaneous Discrimination Training
After the first two targets:
1. MT Target 3 in isolation, 2 x 80%
2. MT Target 3 versus unknown distractors, 2 x 80%
3. MT Target 3 versus known distractors, 2 x 80%
4. MT Target 3 with mastered targets, 2 x 80%

summary
In this lesson, you discussed a simultaneous discrimination training overview, learning about a training method in which a field of stimuli is presented with the instruction. It requires the patient to tell the difference between two or more stimuli that are present at the same time. You learned that in this training, we use seven steps for “no known” targets, which means that the patient does not have any mastered skills or targets within the skill set. You also learned that we use four steps for “known” targets, meaning that the patient has some mastered targets within the skill set.

Terms to Know
Simultaneous Discrimination Training

A field of stimuli is presented with the instruction