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Student Exploration- Plants and Snails (answers)

Student Exploration- Plants and Snails (answers)

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Author: Jack Bauer
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Student Exploration: Plants and Snails

Vocabulary: aerobic respiration, bromothymol blue (BTB), carbon dioxide-oxygen cycle, indicator, interdependence, photosynthesis

Prior Knowledge Questions (Do these BEFORE using the Gizmo.)

What important gas do we take in when we breathe?

Why don’t we run out of the important gases that we need to stay alive?

Gizmo Warm-up

In the Plants and Snails Gizmo™, each of the test tubes contains water and a small amount of bromothymol blue (BTB). BTB is a chemical indicator. An indicator changes color when the chemicals in the water change.

With the lights set to on, drag a snail into one test tube and a plant into another. Press Play (). After 24 hours, what is the color of each tube?

Select Show oxygen and CO2 values. Place the O2/CO2 probe in each tube. The probe shows the levels of two gases, oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2), in the tubes. We call these amounts the gas levels.

When the water turns blue, which gas is most common?

When the water turns yellow, which gas is most common?

What does it tell you when the water is green?

Activity A:



Gases in and gases out


Get the Gizmo ready:



Click Reset ( ).
Clear all of the test tubes.
Turn on Show oxygen and CO2 values.












Question: What gases do plants and animals take in and what do they give off?

Collect data: Use the Gizmo to learn what gases plants and animals take in and give off. Try it in both light and dark. Record your results below. If you do more than five experiments, write your extra results in your notebook or on separate sheets of paper.

Analyze: Study your data on gases given off by plants.

What gas do plants give off in the light?

How about in the dark?

Analyze: Study your data on gases given off by animals.

What gas do animals give off in the light?

How about in the dark?

How do these results compare to your plant results?

Infer: Describe the carbon dioxide-oxygen cycle by completing the sentences below:



Activity B:



Interdependence


Get the Gizmo ready:



Click Reset.
Clear all of the test tubes.
Turn the light switch to on.
Check Show oxygen and CO2 values.












Question: How do plants and animals depend on each other?

Observe: Put one sprig of Elodea and one snail in a test tube with the lights on. Click Play.

Does the color of the water in the tube change?

What happens to the O2 and CO2 levels?

Predict: Without using the Gizmo, predict what you think will happen to the gas levels in each case listed below. (Leave the Actual result column blank for now.)

Run Gizmo: Now run the Gizmo to test your predictions. Record your findings in the table.

Generalize: Describe how plants and animals each contribute to the survival of the other. (This type of cooperative relationship is called interdependence.)

Challenge: Simulate a 24-hour day (12 hours of light, 12 hours of dark). How many snails and plants do you need to keep a stable environment? Explain any discoveries you make.



Activity C:



The carbon-oxygen balance


Get the Gizmo ready:



Click Reset.
Clear all of the test tubes.
Turn the light switch to on.
Check Show oxygen and CO2 values.





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