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Supporting Your Ideas

Supporting Your Ideas

Author: Sophia Tutorial
Description:

Explain how to use ideas and examples to back up claims in a speech

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Tutorial

what's covered
In this lesson, you will learn how to support the main ideas that you want to communicate in your speech. Specifically, this lesson will cover:
  1. Supporting Your Ideas
  2. Set the Stage
  3. Appeal to Commonalities
  4. Finding a Consensus
  5. Tell a Story
  6. Deconstruct Your Topic

1. Supporting Your Ideas

Preparing Supporting Ideas and Materials

Once you have solidified your position in your thesis statement, you want to back up your thesis with a variety of supporting ideas and examples.

To do this, there are several ways you can support your claims while adding variety and interest to the overall story of your speech.


2. Set the Stage

Using exposition is a great way to get your audience all on the same playing field.

When you use an expository approach, you're carefully laying out all of the background information your audience needs to know in order to understand your point.

term to know
Exposition
The act of declaring or describing something through either speech or writing.


3. Appeal to Commonalities

As you notice commonalties between audience members, the audience and your topic, and you and your audience, appeal to those commonalities to not only establish rapport but also to more easily persuade them to your thesis and claims.

Your audience is more likely to trust and believe you if they feel they share something in common with you and your topic.


4. Finding a Consensus

Your audience may already feel a certain way about your topic.

Depending on what you're trying to argue, you may want to go ahead and appeal to that consensus.

Just be careful— you don't want to bore your audience by "preaching to the choir."


5. Tell a Story

One of the best ways to back up your claims - besides cold, hard facts and data - is to share a personal story or anecdote.

This shows your audience that you really connect to your subject, making you more believable and personable.

Using anecdotes are a perfect opportunity to lighten the mood and add some humor as appropriate to your speech.

term to know
Anecdote
An account or story which supports an argument, but which is not supported by scientific or statistical analysis.


6. Deconstruct Your Topic

You might have a particularly complex subject or thesis. In these instances, it's helpful to break it down into its simplest parts.

By breaking your information down into bite-sized chunks, your audience may have an easier time of following your train of thought or logic.

summary
In this lesson, you learned how to support your ideas in a speech. Set the stage for how you plan to address your argument and make your case by laying out the exposition of your argument. Appeal to commonalities between yourself and the audience to influence your audience by persuasion. If you are speaking to a sympathetic crowd, consider influencing your audience by finding a consensus on your given topic. Use personal narratives and anecdotes to tell a story, if appropriate for your audience, topic, and speech venue. If your idea is complex, consider deconstructing your topic into simpler parts to more thoroughly and easily describe your idea.

Source: Boundless. "Supporting Your Ideas." Boundless Communications Boundless, Invalid Date Invalid Date. Invalid Date. Retrieved ‎18 ‎May. ‎2017 from https://www.boundless.com/communications/textbooks/boundless-communications-textbook/preparing-the-speech-a-process-outline-3/steps-of-preparing-a-speech-26/supporting-your-ideas-122-10683/

Terms to Know
Anecdote

An account or story which supports an argument, but which is not supported by scientific or statistical analysis.

Exposition

The act of declaring or describing something through either speech or writing.