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The Italian Renaissance

The Italian Renaissance

Author: cory jensen
Description:

To introduce the the Italian Renaissance. Namely, the purpose is to introduce the political, economic, and artistic growth in Italy from 1300-1500, and its implications afterward.

The impact and rediscovery of Roman and Greek art had a profound impact on individualism in Italy during the 1300's, or High Middle Ages. This newly-found individualism brought forth ideas of individual achievement in art, economics, and politics on a grander scale than the past 900 years of Western European history. Italy was the first place where these new individual achievements were felt, and thus the birthplace of the Renaissance.

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Tutorial

The Birth of a Dynasty: Medici, Godfathers of the Renaissance

The origins of the Medici dynasty are discussed in this PBS documentary.

Source: PBS

Questions to answer about the Medici:

Empires: the Medici. Video Questions.
1. The Medici started off in what Italian city-state?
2. This city was a _____________, but one that was dominated by powerful _________________.
3. The Medici family practice was:
4. Who was Baldassare Cosa? Why would the Medici see fit to support this man?
5. What happened to Baldassare Cosa in 1410?
6. How does this result relate to the Medici? What do they become known as after this event?
7. What was the city of Florence’s ‘humiliating failure?’
8. What did a cathedral represent in a Medieval/Early Renaissance European city?
9. Who did the Medici look towards to build this dome?
10. Solving the problem of the dome required men study what? How does this relate to one of the main ideas behind this period?
11. 1419 – the showcase of Brunelleschi’s ideas was at where in Florence? What did he use that was so unorthodox in his building style?
12. “_______________ __________________” came out of this design by Brunelleschi that sparked an architectural revolution in Europe.
13. The Medici were interested in promoting what through art, literature, and architecture?
14. The Roman ________________________captured Brunelleschi’s imagination.
15. Brunelleschi’s dome would have to be supported how, as opposed to the above Roman building?
16. (33:00) The Medici’s influence could be seen in their bank. How did this impact Florentine business?
17. Cosimo d’Medici was “king, in all but name.” How so?
18. How did the Medici bank expand during this time (after Cosimo’s return to Firenze)?
a.
b.
19. Cosimo spent 600,000 golden Florents in patronage – what is it?
20. Express on the back: Describe how patronage and the arts related to one another in Florence & Italy, forging the beginnings of the Renaissance.

Europe's Rise in the Early Modern Period

This is a wordy presentation on the rise of Europe during the Early Modern Period.

Questions - Europe's Rise PPT

Give a paragraph for each of these answers.

 

1. Where did people like the Medici fit into European politics from 1450-1750?

2. How did the middle class begin to revive European economics? What examples from the Medici video could you use as evidence to support your answer?

3. How did the Medici, and other rising families in Europe, exhibit humanism, and therefore, individualism?

4. Artistically, what transition happened between Medieval and Renaissance art? What differences mark this transition? Think about the content of art and architecture. Think about the techniques and materials used. Think about the use of the art for other or outside purposes. Here's a prime example:


Photo courtesy of Wikipedia