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Transition words

Transition words

Author: Ryan Howard
Description:
  1.  

    Introduce transition words and how they can improve writing. 

  2.  

    List a variety of transition words that show a contrast.

  3.  

    List a variety of transition words that show addition.

  4.  

    List a variety of transition words that show illustration.

  5.  

    List a variety of transition words that show cause and effect. 

 

This packet should help a learner seeking to understand English writing style and who is confused about how to incorporate appropriate transition words. It will explain common transition words and their purposes in writing.  

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Tutorial

Introduction to Transition Words

Transition Words help sentences or paragraphs with different ideas come together and move more freely.  They can also add coherence to the writing.

 

Some transition words and phrases include:

Consequently

As a result

Therefore

Then

To be sure

No doubt

Admittedly

On the contrary

In addition

 

Here are some sample sentences without the transition words:

 

Mary bought a tube of toothpaste and dental floss.  She also bought some stationery, pens, and batteries.

 

You cannot go to the mall today.  You also cannot go to the movies.

 

I am angry at you for not doing your homework.  I am going to let bygones be bygones.

 

Those sentences do not seem to flow very well do they?  Perhaps we could add a few transition words. 

Looking back at the first sentence, we see that Mary did not only buy toothpaste and floss, but also stationery, pens, and batteries.  Using the transition "in addition to, " the sentence could read something like this:

In addition to a tube of toothpaste and dental floss, Mary bought some stationery, pens, and batteries.

Adding "in addition to" connects the two sentences and makes them flow more smoothly.

 

For the second sentence we can add "nor" because it is telling someone they cannot go to the mall or to the movies. 

You cannot go to the mall, nor can you go to the movies.

The third sentence, in which one person appears to be angry at another for not doing their homework, yet is going to let it go, should probably have the word "nevertheless" or "nonetheless."

I am angry at you for not doing your homework.  Nonetheless, I am going to let bygones be bygones.

By having those two sentences free of a transition word, the reader is not quite sure whether or not the second sentence refers to the preceding sentence.

 

Conclusion

Things leanred in this packet:

 

A transition word is used to connect two ideas, add coherence, and make the writing flow more smoothly.

 

Transition Words:

  • Show Contrast
  • Show Illustration
  • Show addition
  • Show Cause and Effect

Source: see above sections for sources