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Type & Image

Type & Image

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This lesson introduces you to the art of combining type and image on the page.

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Tutorial

What's Covered

  1. The Page
  2. Golden Section
  3. Desktop Publishing
  4. WYSIWYG

1. The Page

You have two typical pages here international A4 and Standard US paper. A4 is more of international standard, especially in Europe. It comes in at 8.267 by 11.693 inches. It's typically rounded off to 8.3 by 11.7. The US paper is what we are all typically accustomed to using to write and print. And that runs 8.5 inches wide by 11 inches tall. You can see the difference in proportion in the image below.

and narrower than the US Standard. The US page is a bit shorter and wider by comparison.


2. Golden Section

OK, so now you know what common paper sizes are, the lesson will move onto the golden section. The golden section is a geometrically-calculated proportion recognized through art and design history as aesthetically pleasing.

Term to Know

    • Golden Section
    • A geometrically calculated proportion, recognized throughout art and design history as aesthetically pleasing.

So this is important to know, as simple as it sounds, because you want to make your designs aesthetically pleasing, of course. So you might have seen the image below, this is what is known as the golden section.

And you can see it has these two simple divisions and this ratio can be taken further to create these square areas that are also proportionate to each other. They get proportionally smaller or larger, depending on the direction. It also creates this flow and sense of direction for the viewer.

The image below is called the golden spiral or Fibonacci spiral.

This is useful in aiding designers with layout. So placing different bodies of type or type and image combinations in ways that create an easy reading experience, a nice flow, and a aesthetically-pleasing design.

The image below is an example of a illuminated manuscript. The text and decoration, like decorated letters, like we saw from the last example or decorative borders, illustrations and the such.

3. Desktop Publishing

With the way technology has progressed, it's become a lot easier to create layouts in publishing. This is called desktop publishing, which is the term for the creation of digital documents using page layout software.

Term to Know

    • Desktop Publishing
    • The term for the creation of digital documents using page layout software; this production method revolutionized the work of the graphic designer.

This production method revolutionized the work of the graphic designer. So a combination of the introduction of the PC, page layout software, and laser printer really impacted the design, practice, print production, and cycle, or workflow. Below is a quick look at the breakdown of the desktop publishing process.

Copies, photos, and graphics get combined into the finished layout and printed final topic. 

In the cycle - or rather, workflow - there is copywrighting in the graphic or photography, so, again, that type and image.  Often, this is handled simultaneously by a writer, photographer, and Illustrator. 

If not, the writer will use word processing software, like Writer or MS Word. The photographer can use digital cameras and image editing software. Or the Illustrator can use illustration software, editing software, like Gimp or Photoshop, and others. 

Then a graphic designer or desktop publisher combines type an image with page layout software.


4. WYSIWYG

With today's process and technology, desktop publishing is way easier than ever before, because of what's called WYSIWYG and it stands for "what you see is what you get."

Term to Know

    • WYSIWYG
    • "What You See is What You Get" Used to describe the ability to see type and image detail on a computer screen that is the equivalent of the printed version.

It's used to describe the ability to see type and image detail on a computer screen that is the equivalent of the printed version. So a designer's able to put something together in software like Photoshop and know that what he sees on screen is basically what it's going to look like when it's printed. You can see from the example below here that the printout is not 100% identical and, ultimately, it's more of an approximation. But you start to see WYSIWYG in action, where what you see on screen becomes very close to the end result when it's printed.

Summary

Well, that ends today's lesson on type and image. This lesson looks specifically at the dimensions of the page that the type and images are found on. Then this lesson covered the golden section and the usefulness of desktop publishing. Finally, this lesson covered the great value in technology that has allowed WYSIWYG, or "what you see is what you get."

Keep up the learning and have a great day!

Source: SOURCE: THIS WORK IS ADAPTED FROM SOPHIA AUTHOR MARIO E. HERNANDEZ

TERMS TO KNOW
  • Golden Section

    A geometrically calculated proportion, recognized throughout art and design history as aesthetically pleasing.

  • Desktop Publishing

    The term for the creation of digital documents using page layout software; this production method revolutionized the work of the graphic designer.

  • WYSIWYG

    "What You See is What You Get" Used to describe the ability to see type and image detail on a computer screen that is the equivalent of the printed version.