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Vectors

Vectors

Description:

Students will identify and mathematically solve for unbalanced and balanced forces in real world scenarios using friction, free-body diagrams, and vectors. 

Be sure to take good notes. Stop, rewind, pause as needed.

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Tutorial

Displacement, Distance, and Vectors

Here is the video for your notes. Be sure to pause, rewind, and stop as necessary.

Source: Langhans and various other educators

These are the “S” in WSQ. You must have them under your video notes completed by the due date on the Unit Plan.

 

 

3. A book is at rest on a table-top. A free-body diagram for this situation looks like this:

4. A girl is suspended motionless from a bar which hangs from the ceiling by two ropes. A free-body diagram for the girl in this situation looks like this:

5. An egg is free-falling from a nest in a tree. Neglect air resistance. A free-body diagram for this situation looks like this:

6. A flying squirrel is gliding (no wing flaps) from a tree to the ground at constant velocity. Consider air resistance. A free-body diagram for this situation looks like this:

7. A rightward force is applied to a book in order to move it across a desk with a rightward acceleration. Consider frictional forces. Neglect air resistance. A free-body diagram for this situation looks like this:

8. A rightward force is applied to a book in order to move it across a desk at constant velocity. Consider frictional forces. Neglect air resistance. A free-body diagram for this situation looks like this: 

9. A college student rests a backpack upon his shoulder. The pack is suspended motionless by one strap from one shoulder. A free-body diagram for the backpack in this situation looks like this: 

10. A skydiver is descending with a constant velocity. Consider air resistance. A free-body diagram for this situation looks like this: 

11. A force is applied to the right to drag a sled across loosely-packed snow with a rightward acceleration. A free-body diagram for this situation looks like this:

12. A car is coasting to the right and slowing down. A free-body diagram for this situation looks like this:

Question about your Notes: write your question following the guidelines below:

Question- asking Higher Order Thinking (HOT) questions; use the following as your guide:
1. A question that you are still confused about (be specific, include which part of the video, etc)
2. A question that connects the videos together (i.e. asking about the relationship between the content)
3. A question you think you know the answer to, but you want to challenge your classmates with
Use your Unit Plan to help with question starters

Source: inspired by C. Kirch