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Wording the Speech

Wording the Speech

Author: Sophia Tutorial
Description:

Discuss tips and tricks for drafting a speech

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Tutorial

what's covered
In this lesson, you will learn about the importance of word choice in your speech. Specifically, this lesson will focus on:
  1. Find the Right Wording for Your Speech
  2. Writing Your First Draft
  3. Refine, Refine, Refine: Editing and Revising
    1. Editing
    2. Revising
  4. Dealing with Writer's Block

1. Find the Right Wording for Your Speech

Handwritten speech notes by President Ronald Reagan

The art of public speaking comes from the eloquence of the speaker.

While researching your subject and outlining your speech may seem like the most time-consuming aspect of preparation, taking the time to write your speech can actually take the most time to complete.

term to know
Eloquence
The quality of artistry and persuasiveness in speech or writing.


2. Writing Your First Draft

When you begin writing your speech, don't assume what you write now will be the final version of your speech. A draft is simply your first pass at what you plan to say.

Using your outline as a guide, refer to your organized research notes (that you've centrally collected and have easily accessible for just such an occasion, right? ) to begin to flesh out your speech.

It is helpful to take an ABC (abstract, body, conclusion) approach to writing your speech:

1. Introduce your subject and thesis in an abstract, or introduction, section. This abstract gives a general summary about what you plan to speak.
2. Then write your body, where you will make and substantiate claims to support and argue your thesis.
3. Finally, write your conclusion, tying it all together in one memorable finish.

You may find that you start to veer off-topic as you begin to write your speech. You will have time to go back and prune later; for now, the focus is to keep writing.

term to know
Abstract
A summary at the beginning of a formal article or speech.


3. Refine, Refine, Refine: Editing and Revising

Now that you have written the first draft, reread what you have written to refine your wording.

3a. Editing

Read through your first draft. Look for typos such as spelling and grammatical errors. Also look for awkward phrasing or parts of speech. Read sections aloud: Do they make sense? If so, reword those sections.

Consider the vocabulary you are using: Is it appropriate? Are you potentially using language that may go over your audience's heads, or perhaps is too elementary? Consider your tone, style and verbiage. Also consider the structure of your argument: does your speech actually make sense?

It is helpful to give your first draft to another person to review and edit, as it helps to have a fresh set of eyes look at your material.

3b. Revising

Once edits have been made, implement those suggestions and changes to your draft.

When you begin revising, you may find that you are making more changes along the way and may write multiple drafts. The editing and revising process becomes a cycle of newer drafts.

Eventually, the revisions will be done and you will have settled on your final draft.


4. Dealing with Writer's Block

Have you ever sat down in front of your computer, a blank document open, the cursor just blinking at you, and no words come to your brain?

Don't panic! It is a harrowing moment for any writer, but don't be alarmed: writer's block is perfectly natural and there are ways to overcome it.

Some tackle writer's block by forcing themselves to write anything, as long as they keep writing. You can set a timer and commit to keep writing without stopping until that timer ends. Hopefully, that will be enough of a boost to get your writer's juices flowing.

If not, walk away from your speech for a little while. Sometimes it is good to clear your mind from a subject in which you are thoroughly engrossed in order to gain a fresh perspective.

When in doubt, two heads are better than one. Call up a friend, colleague, or classmate and share ideas with them. They just might have the inspiration and outside perspective you need to get your hands flying across your keyboard in no time.

term to know
Writer's Block
The inability to begin or continue work on a piece of writing; normally temporary.

summary
In this lesson, you learned how to find the right wording for your speech. Use the ABC (abstract, body, conclusion) approach to begin your first draft. The abstract explains your thesis, the body features your main points and supporting evidence, and the conclusion contains your final thoughts and reiterates your point. Make sure to have all of your notes and research close by and easily accessible so you can turn to your sources as often as you need to while your draft your speech. Editing and revising are not the same thing.

To edit, review your speech for changes. To revise, actually implement those changes. Editing and revising are cyclical in nature as you continue to hone your draft. If on your first draft you find yourself going off on a tangent, allow yourself to follow it. You can always edit, revise and remove sections later that are wordy or off-topic. Writer's block can happen to even the best writers. Take a break for a few minutes and come back to your speech renewed and refreshed. But don't stay away too long or you might lose your momentum.

Source: Boundless. "Wording the Speech." Boundless Communications Boundless, Invalid Date Invalid Date. Invalid Date. Retrieved ‎18 ‎May. ‎2017 from https://www.boundless.com/communications/textbooks/boundless-communications-textbook/preparing-the-speech-a-process-outline-3/steps-of-preparing-a-speech-26/wording-the-speech-124-10682/

Terms to Know
Abstract

A summary at the beginning of a formal article or speech.

Eloquence

The quality of artistry and persuasiveness in speech or writing.

Writer's Block

The inability to begin or continue work on a piece of writing; normally temporary.