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3 Tutorials that teach Writing a Linear Equation Using Slope and Points
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Writing a Linear Equation Using Slope and Points

Writing a Linear Equation Using Slope and Points

Description:

This lesson demonstrates how to write a linear equation using slope and points.

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Tutorial

  • Forms of Linear Equations
  • Using Slope and a Point on the Line
  • Using Two Points on the Line
  • Using Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

Forms of Linear Equations

When writing linear equations that rely on points on the line and the slopes of lines, we primarily work with two forms of linear equations: point-slope form, and slope-intercept form.  


Slope-Intercept Form

y equals m x plus b

Equations written in slope-intercept form rely on the line's slope, m, and the y-coordinate of the y-intercept, b, to form the equation. 


Point-Slope Form


left parenthesis y minus y subscript 1 right parenthesis space equals space m left parenthesis x minus x subscript 1 right parenthesis

Equations written in point-slope form rely on the line's slope, m, and a point on the line (x1, y1) to form the equation.

 

Using the Slope and a Point on the Line

When given information about a line's slope and a point on the line, it is easiest to write the equation in point-slope form, since the pertinent information needed to form the equation is already given to us.  Here is an example:

Write the equation of a line with a slope of –2 that passes through the point (4, 9). 

While developing the formula in point-slope form was certainly our easiest option, often times having our equation in slope-intercept form is helpful so that we may graph the line.  Slope-intercept form isolates y onto one side of the equation, with mx+b on the other side of the equation.  Let's see how we can take our equation in point-slope form, and rewrite it so that we can more easily graph this line:

 


Using Two Points on the Line

When we are only given information about two points on the line, and no information about the slope of the line, we can use the same processes above, we just need to calculate the line's slope ourselves.  To do this, we use the following formula:

m equals fraction numerator y subscript 2 minus y subscript 1 over denominator x subscript 2 minus x subscript 1 end fraction

where (x1, y1) and (x2, y2) are the two points on the line.  In other words, we can find the difference in y-coordinates and divide it by the difference in x-coordinates to find the slope.  This we can plug-in to our equation for the line.  From there, we can take any one of our two points to write the equation in point-slope form.  Here is an example:

Find the equation of a line that passes through the points (–2, 5) and (3, 12).

First we need to use the two points to calculate the slope:


Now that we know the slope of the line, we can use either point to write the equation in point-slope form:

Just like with our example before, we can rewrite this equation into slope-intercept form, so that we may more easily graph this line:


Using Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

Sometimes we are given information about a line, and then asked to write the equation to a line parallel or perpendicular to it.  In these cases, we need to apply the relationship between the slopes of parallel lines and the slopes between perpendicular lines.

  • Parallel lines have identical slopes.  This means that the values for m in their equations is exactly the same. 
  • Perpendicular lines have opposite reciprocal slopes.  This means that not only is the slope "flipped" (the numerator becomes the denominator, and the denominator becomes the numerator), but the sign is reversed as well (positive becomes negative, and negative becomes positive).  

It is probably more challenging to work with problems involving perpendicular lines, so we will go through an example:

Find the equation of the line perpendicular to y space equals space space 4 over 3 x space minus space 5 that passes through the point (–3, 2)